Advances in the Study of Behavior, Volume 33

Front Cover
Peter J.B. Slater, Jay S. Rosenblatt, Charles T. Snowdon, Timothy J. Roper, Marc Naguib
Elsevier, Dec 18, 2003 - Psychology - 370 pages
The aim of Advances in the Study of Behavior remains as it has been since the series began: to serve the increasing number of scientists who are engaged in the study of animal behavior by presenting their theoretical ideas and research to their colleagues and to those in neighboring fields. We hope that the series will continue its "contribution to the development of the field", as its intended role was phrased in the Preface to the first volume in 1965. Since that time, traditional areas of animal behavior have achieved new vigor by the links they have formed with related fields and by the closer relationship that now exists between those studying animal and human subjects.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Teamwork in Animals Robots and Humans
1
Vocal Production and Perception Learning in Female Songbirds
49
Chapter 3 Selection in Relation to Sex in Primates
87
Chapter 4 Genetic Basis and Evolutionary Aspects of Bird Migration
175
Chapter 5 Vocal Communication and Reproduction in Deer
231
Cognitive Precursors and Limitations for the Evolution of Language
265
From the Ring Dove Story to EmotionBased Vocal Communication
309
Index
355
Contents of Previous Volumes
365
Copyright

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Page 27 - A team is a small number of people with complementary skills who are committed to a common purpose, performance goals and approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable.
Page 27 - A group of people is not a team. A team is a group of people with a high degree of interdependence geared toward the achievement of a goal or completion of a task.
Page 17 - ... up and down, it really seemed that she was taking advantage of the leverage thus gained, and was bringing the augmented force to bear upon the fracture. In two or three cases there appeared to be a division of labour ; that is to say, while the cutter at the roots kept on with his work, another ant climbed the grass blade, and applied the power at the opposite end of the lever.

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About the author (2003)

Dr. Peter Slater is a Kennedy Professor of Natural History at the University of St Andrews, in Scotland. He is a former Editor of the journal Animal Behaviour and past President of the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. He received the Association's medal in 1999. His research interests are in vocal communication, with emphasis on the development and organization of song in birds.

Dr. Jay S. Rosenblatt is the Daniel S. Lehrman Professor of Psychobiology in the Psychology Department of Rutgers University-Newark Campus, Newark, NJ. He is an Associate of the Animal Behavior Society and the American Psychological Association and has received honorary doctoral degrees from Göteborg University in Sweden and National University of Education at a Distance, Madrid. His interests include the study of parental behavior and behavioral development among animals.

Charles T. Snowdon is a Hilldale Professor of Psychology and Zoology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Currently editor of the Journal of Comparative Psychology, he was previously North American Editor of Animal Behaviour and has served as President of the Animal Behavior Society. He has held a Research Scientist Award from the National Institute of Mental Health since 1977. His research interests are in vocal and chemical communication, reproductive behavioral biology, parental care and infant development in cooperatively breeding primates. His students and collaborators work in both captive and field settings.

Tim Roper is Emeritus Professor of Animal Behaviour at the University of Sussex, UK. After completing a PhD in Experimental Psychology (Cambridge 1973) he undertook postdoctoral research at the Universities of Oregon and Cambridge. He was appointed Lecturer in Biology at the University of Sussex in 1979, Reader in 1993 and Professor in 1998. He was Honorary Secretary of the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour (1982-87) and has served on the editorial boards of various journals, including Advances in the Study of Behaviour (1996-2014) and Animal Behaviour (as European Editor, 1991-96). He has also been appointed to a number of UK government advisory committees, including periods as Special Scientific Advisor to the House of Commons Agriculture Select Committee (1999-2000) and as advisor to the UK Government Chief Scientific Officer (2008). He has published 120 scientific papers on various aspects of animal behaviour and ecology, including animal learning, the evolution of insect warning coloration, the social and territorial behaviour of mammals, the transmission of bovine tuberculosis between badgers and cattle, the use of remotely collected DNA in estimating population size, urban wildlife management, and communal decision making in animals. He has co-authored a number of government reports and has authored one book (Badger, Harper Collins, 2010). He retired from the University of Sussex in 2010 and now works as a full-time house husband.

Marc Naguib is professor in Behavioural Ecology at the Animal Sciences Department of Wageningen University, The Netherlands. He studied biology at the Freie Universitaet Berlin, Germany and received his PhD (1995) at UNC Chapel Hill, NC in the US. After his PhD held positions at the Freie Universitaet Berlin (1995-1999) and Bielefeld University (2000-2007) in Germany, and at the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (2008-2011), until he was appointed in 2011 as Chair of the Behavioural Ecology Group at Wageningen University, The Netherlands. He is specialized in vocal communication, social behaviour, animal personality and the effects of conditions experienced during early development on behaviour and life history traits, mainly using song birds as model. His research group is also involved in animal welfare research using farm animals. He has served for many years on the council of the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour (ASAB) and of the Ethologische Gesellschaft. He published > 80 scientific publications and has been Editor for Advances in the Study of Behaviour since 2003. Since 2014 he is Executive Editor.

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