Advances in the Study of Behavior, Volume 22

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Academic Press, Apr 20, 1993 - Psychology - 330 pages
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Advances in the Study of Behavior is the leading series in its field. Each volume includes a variety of review essays by experts providing authoritative overviews of key areas of current interest that are invaluable to the teacher, student, and researcher in the field of behavior, whether psychologist or biologist. This volume continues the tradition of excellence in the study of behavior by covering a whole range of biological and psychological research. Each of the chapters presents new ideas, with a particularly interesting approach to sexual coercion. The volume as a whole has a particular strength in the area of behavioral development, which is the main topic of the last three chapters.
 

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Contents

Evidence and Theoretical Implications
1
Chapter 2 Parasites and the Evolution of Host Social Behavior
65
Lessons Learned from Divergent Spider Populations
103
Chapter 4 Proximate and Developmental Aspects of Antipredator Behavior
135
The Interaction That Leads to Sucking
239
Form Development Form Fixation and Change in Context
269
lndex
323
Contents of Previous Volumes
328
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About the author (1993)

Dr. Peter Slater is a Kennedy Professor of Natural History at the University of St Andrews, in Scotland. He is a former Editor of the journal Animal Behaviour and past President of the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. He received the Association's medal in 1999. His research interests are in vocal communication, with emphasis on the development and organization of song in birds.

Charles T. Snowdon is a Hilldale Professor of Psychology and Zoology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Currently editor of the Journal of Comparative Psychology, he was previously North American Editor of Animal Behaviour and has served as President of the Animal Behavior Society. He has held a Research Scientist Award from the National Institute of Mental Health since 1977. His research interests are in vocal and chemical communication, reproductive behavioral biology, parental care and infant development in cooperatively breeding primates. His students and collaborators work in both captive and field settings.

Dr. Jay S. Rosenblatt is the Daniel S. Lehrman Professor of Psychobiology in the Psychology Department of Rutgers University-Newark Campus, Newark, NJ. He is an Associate of the Animal Behavior Society and the American Psychological Association and has received honorary doctoral degrees from Göteborg University in Sweden and National University of Education at a Distance, Madrid. His interests include the study of parental behavior and behavioral development among animals.

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