Adventures in Law and Justice: Exploring Big Legal Questions in Everyday Life

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UNSW Press, 2003 - Law - 376 pages
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This book presents a down-to-earth explanation of topical and newsworthy law-and-justice dilemmas. Written for readers interested in public affairs and current events, as well as those grappling with ʻbig pictureʼ issues in law and government as students, professionals or concerned citizens, this book serves as an introduction, a critique, and a thought-provoking read all in one. Vividly illustrated with Australian and international examples, it tells lawʼs stories, exposes lawʼs myths, and delves into major law-and-justice questions which affect us all. Some of the questions the book addresses, include: Should Australia become a republic or stay a constitutional monarchy? Is the legal system in crisis? Should Australia have a bill of rights? Is native title legally dead in the water? Can the law decide which conjoined twin should be saved when only one can live? Can someone in pain lawfully end his or her life with medical assistance? Does Australiaʼs involvement in the war against terrorism threaten democratic freedoms and international law? Should companies have social obligations legally imposed on them?
 

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
7
Section 3
10
Section 4
12
Section 5
15
Section 6
23
Section 7
55
Section 8
83
Section 10
155
Section 11
189
Section 12
223
Section 13
261
Section 14
299
Section 15
333
Section 16
335
Section 17
345

Section 9
119

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About the author (2003)

Bryan Horrigan is a professor of law at the University of Canberra, director of the National Centre for Corporate Law and Policy Research, and deputy director of the National Institute for Governance in Canberra.

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