Adventures in the Orgasmatron: How the Sexual Revolution Came to America

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Macmillan, Jun 7, 2011 - Psychology - 544 pages
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One of The Economist's 2011 Books of the Year
A Boston Globe Best Nonfiction Book of 2011

Well before the 1960s, a sexual revolution was under way in America, led by expatriated European thinkers who saw a vast country ripe for liberation. In Adventures in the Orgasmatron, Christopher Turner tells the revolution's story—an illuminating, thrilling, often bizarre story of sex and science, ecstasy and repression.

Central to the narrative is the orgone box—a tall, slender construction of wood, metal, and steel wool. A person who sat in the box, it was thought, could elevate his or her "orgastic potential." The box was the invention of Wilhelm Reich, an outrider psychoanalyst who faced a federal ban on the orgone box, an FBI investigation, a fraught encounter with Einstein, and bouts of paranoia.

In Turner's vivid account, Reich's efforts anticipated those of Alfred Kinsey, Herbert Marcuse, and other prominent thinkers—efforts that brought about a transformation of Western views of sexuality in ways even the thinkers themselves could not have imagined.

 

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For a critical review of the many omissions, lies and distortions in this hack-writer fiction book, do a websearch on "critical review of turner orgasmatron". The mainstream media is flooded with only fanatical applause of this wretched book, slandering a decent man who was murdered for his scientific discoveries. And it is the "anti-Reichians" who are the ones harboring the vitriol, constantly spewing defamatory slander against Reich, and apologetics for government book-burning. 

Contents

Introduction
Europe
One
Two
Three
Four
Five
America
Nine
Ten
Eleven
Twelve
Thirteen
Notes Bibliography Acknowledgments Index
NOTES
Bibliography

Six
Seven
Eight
Index
Acknowledgments
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Christopher Turner lives in London and writes for The Guardian and other publications.

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