Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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Prestwick House Inc, Jan 30, 2005 - Juvenile Fiction - 280 pages
2 Reviews
This Prestwick House Literary Touchstone Edition includes a glossary and reader's notes to help the modern reader contend with Twain's language, allusions, and deliberate misstatements and malapropisms.The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain's sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, became an instant success in the year of its publication, 1884, but was seen by some as unfit for children to read because of its language, grammar, and "uncivilized hero." The book has sparked controversy ever since, but most scholars continue to praise it as a modern masterpiece, an essential read, and one of the greatest novels in all of American literature.Twain's satiric treatment of racism, religious excess, and rural simplicity and his accuracy in presenting dialects mark Huck Finn as a classic. His unswerving confidence in Huck's wisdom and maturity, along with the well-rounded and sympathetic portrayal of Jim draw readers into the book, holding them until Huck's last words rejecting all attempts to "sivilize" him.
 

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Luke Daniel Book Review
5/18/16
Mr. Simmer
1st Period Honors English 10
H. L. Mencken noted that his discovery of this classic American novel was "the most stupendous event of my whole life". Ernest Hemingway stated that "all modern American literature stems from this one book," while T. S. Eliot called Huck "one of the permanent symbolic figures of fiction, not unworthy to take a place with Ulysses, Faust, Don Quixote, Don Juan, Hamlet.”
The book starts off where “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” left off. Huck is a self sufficient, superstitious, cunning boy who is forced to live a “proper life”. The book explains the troubles he went through, and is said to be “mostly true”, and that Huckleberry Finn was a real person. Huckleberry Finn goes through some struggles that we all face, and some that are extremely outlandish. The book is a pleasure to read, and reminds readers of their childhood, when daily tasks seemed like everyday adventures of a lifetime.
Mark Twain reverts back to his childhood along the Mississippi River when writing this book. Growing up, although he did share many similarities with Huckleberry Finn, he also utilized his amazing imagination to write the book, and the combination of childhood memories and imaginative qualities creates a feeling of nostalgia and excitement in the reader, as the reader recalls their own childhood.
I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who would anyone who would like to read an exciting, American classic. Personally, I do not enjoy reading, but because of school I am forced to. This book is probably one of the best in my opinion, but I still would rather be doing just about anything else, such as hunting, fishing, and loving everyday (that’s a country song). If forced to read, I would read this book. I read it once before when i was younger, and enjoyed it very much. If it was up to me, I would not read anything that I do not have to read, but because of school and parents, who require me to participate in school, I read. I try to read books about things I enjoy, such as military books, books about aircraft, and other books as short as possible. To make a long story short, this book is good for outdoorsy type people.
 

Contents

Chapter TwentyTwo
143
Chapter TwentyThree
149
Chapter TwentyFour
155
Chapter TwentyFive
161
Chapter TwentySix
167
Chapter TwentySeven
175
Chapter TwentyEight
181
Chapter TwentyNine
189

Chapter Five
31
Chapter
35
Chapter Seven
41
Chapter Eight
47
Chapter Nine
57
Chapter
61
Chapter Eleven
65
Chapter Twelve
71
Chapter Thirteen
77
Chapter Fourteen
83
Chapter Fifteen
87
Chapter Sixteen
93
Chapter Seventeen
101
Chapter Eighteen This
109
Chapter Nineteen 051H3N6NEUS
119
Chapter Twenty
127
Chapter TwentyOne
135
Chapter Thirty
197
Chapter ThirtyOne
201
Chapter ThirtyTwo
209
Chapter ThirtyThree
215
Chapter ThirtyFour
221
Chapter ThirtyFive
227
Chapter ThirtySix
233
Chapter ThirtySeven
239
Chapter ThirtyEight
245
Chapter ThirtyNine
251
Chapter Forty
257
Chapter FortyOne
263
Chapter FortyTwo
269
Chapter The Last
275
Vocabulary and Glossary
277
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer for a time, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled in the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner, Gilded Age in 1873. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi (1883), and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884). He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910.

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