Adventures of the Dialectic

Front Cover
Northwestern University Press, 1973 - Philosophy - 237 pages
0 Reviews
Maurice Merleau-Ponty (French pronunciation: [m is m lop? ti]) (14 March 1908 - 3 May 1961) was a French phenomenological philosopher, strongly influenced by Karl Marx, Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger in addition to being closely associated with Jean-Paul Sartre (who later stated he had been "converted" to Marxism by Merleau-Ponty) and Simone de Beauvoir. At the core of Merleau-Ponty's philosophy is a sustained argument for the foundational role that perception plays in understanding the world as well as engaging with the world. Like the other major phenomenologists Merleau-Ponty expressed his philosophical insights in writings on art, literature, linguistics, and politics. He was the only major phenomenologist of the first half of the twentieth century to engage extensively with the sciences and especially with descriptive psychology. Because of this engagement his writings have become influential in the recent project of naturalizing phenomenology, in which phenomenologists use the results of psychology and cognitive science.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Crisis of Understanding
9
Western Marxism
30
Pravda
59
The Dialectic iri Action
74
Sartre and Ultrabolshevism
95
Epilogue
203
Index
235
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Experiencing Identity
Ian Craib
Limited preview - 1998
All Book Search results »

About the author (1973)

Maurice Merleau-Ponty (French pronunciation: [m??is m??lop?~ti]) (14 March 1908 – 3 May 1961) was a French phenomenological philosopher, strongly influenced by Karl Marx, Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger in addition to being closely associated with Jean-Paul Sartre (who later stated he had been "converted" to Marxism by Merleau-Ponty) and Simone de Beauvoir. At the core of Merleau-Ponty's philosophy is a sustained argument for the foundational role that perception plays in understanding the world as well as engaging with the world. Like the other major phenomenologists Merleau-Ponty expressed his philosophical insights in writings on art, literature, linguistics, and politics. He was the only major phenomenologist of the first half of the twentieth century to engage extensively with the sciences and especially with descriptive psychology. Because of this engagement his writings have become influential in the recent project of naturalizing phenomenology, in which phenomenologists use the results of psychology and cognitive science.

Bibliographic information