Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines: Rotors, Loads and Structure

Front Cover
Earthscan, 2000 - Science - 144 pages
3 Reviews
Wind power is an increasingly significant renewable energy resource, producing no environmentally damaging CO2 emissions. The efficient production of electricity by wind turbines relies on aerodynamics: Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines provides the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Following a historical introduction, Part 1 of Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is concerned with basic rotor aerodynamics, while Part 2 deals with structural aspects of the wind turbine and calculation of the loads on it. Topics covered include increasing mass flow through the turbine, performance at low and high wind speeds, assessment of the extreme conditions under which the turbine will perform and the theory for calculating the lifetime of the turbine. The classical Blade Element Momentum method is also covered, as are eigenmodes and the dynamic behavior of a turbine. Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is an essential reference for both engineering students and others with a professional or academicinterest in the physics and technologies behind horizontal axis wind turbines. It will provide a sound understanding of the mechanisms behind the generation of forces on a wind turbine.
 

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Contents

General introduction to wind turbines
1
Basic rotor aerodynamics
9
Introduction to wind turbine aerodynamics
11
Twodimensional aerodynamics
12
Threedimensional aerodynamics
22
The vortex system of a wind turbine
28
Onedimensional momentum theory for an ideal wind turbine
31
Shrouded rotors
44
Loads and structure
89
Introduction to loads and structures
91
The main loads on a horizontalaxis wind turbine
93
Structures of a wind turbine blade
95
Beam theory for a wind turbine blade
97
An easy way to determine the eigenmodes
112
Sources for loads on a wind turbine
116
Fatigue
126

The blade element momentum method
48
Annual energy production
60
Example
62
Controlregulation and safety systems
67
Optimization
80
Limitations of BEM
85
Final remarks
131
Basic Equations in Fluid Mechanics
135
Symbols
138
References
140
Index
143
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