Affairs in the Philippine Islands: Hearings Before the Committee ... [Jan. 31-June 28, 1902] Aprl 10, 1902. Ordered Printed as a Document, Part 1

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1902 - Philippines
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This is Volume I of 3 volumes, together about 3,000 pages. Extensive testimony from governors, generals, clergymen and privates covering the origins of the Phil-Am War, events during the war, casualty reports, and ideas on Philippine independence. Reports on economics, sanitation and plagues affecting crops, animals and people.
The hearings include disagreements between pro- and anti-war groups, attempts to clear up false rumors, treatment of prisoners, and the "water-cure", which was similar to the "waterboarding" currently in the news.
There are many books written about the Phil-Am War, but none can compare in depth and accuracy with this official testimony. It is long, hard reading, but is the real meat of history.
 

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Page 102 - ... practical rules of government which we have found to be essential to the preservation of these great principles of liberty and law; and that these principles and these rules of government must be established and maintained in their islands for the sake of their liberty and happiness, however much they may conflict with the customs or laws of procedure with which they are familiar.
Page 110 - I will obey the laws, legal orders and decrees promulgated by its duly constituted authorities; that I impose upon myself this obligation voluntarily, without mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter, so help me God.
Page 102 - In all the forms of government and administrative provisions which they are authorized to prescribe the Commission should bear in mind that the government which they are establishing is designed not for our satisfaction, or for the expression of our theoretical views, but for the happiness, peace, and prosperity of the people of the Philippine Islands...
Page 773 - ... and by proving to them that the mission of the United States is one of benevolent assimilation, substituting the mild sway of justice and right for arbitrary rule.
Page 103 - Government which prohibits the taking of private property without due process of law, shall not be violated; that the welfare of the people of the islands, which should be a paramount consideration, shall be attained consistently with this rule of property right; that if it becomes necessary for the public interest of the people of the islands to dispose of claims to property which the Commission finds to be not lawfully acquired and held disposition shall be made...
Page 773 - Finally, it should be the earnest and paramount aim of the military administration to win the confidence, respect and affection of the inhabitants of the Philippines by assuring...
Page 100 - Whenever the commission is of the opinion that the condition of affairs in the islands is such that the central administration may safely be transferred from military to civil control, they will report that conclusion to you, with their recommendations as to the form of central government to be established for the purpose of taking over the control.
Page 103 - That no law shall be passed abridging the freedom of speech or of the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and petition the Government for redress of grievances. That no law shall be made respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, and that the free exercise and enjoyment of religious profession and worship, without discrimination or preference, shall forever be allowed; and no religious test shall be required for the exercise of civil or political...
Page 773 - ... to overcome all obstacles to the bestowal of the blessings of good and stable government upon the people of the Philippine Islands tinder the free flag of the United States.
Page 585 - I hereby serve notice on you that unless your troops are withdrawn beyond the line of the city's defenses before Thursday, the 15th instant, I shall be obliged to resort to forcible action, and that my Government will hold you responsible for any unfortunate consequences which may ensue.

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