Affrilachia

Front Cover
Old Cove Press, 2000 - Poetry - 100 pages

A milestone book of poetry at the intersection of Appalachian and African American literature.

In this pathbreaking debut collection, poet Frank X Walker tells the story of growing up young, Black, artistic, and male in one of America's most misunderstood geographical regions. As a proud Kentucky native, Walker created the word "Affrilachia" to render visible the unique intersectional experience of African Americans living in the rural and Appalachian South.

Since its publication in 2000, Affrilachia has seen wide classroom use, and is recognized as one of the foundational works of the Affrilachian Poets, a community of writers offering new ways to think about diversity in the Appalachian region and beyond.

Published in 2000 by Old Cove Press

 

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User Review  - mydomino1978 - LibraryThing

I met Dr. Walker, did not know who he was at the time, which gave his friends quite a laugh. His book isn't as wonderful as hearing him read in person, but at least one of the poems I found quite ... Read full review

Contents

I
3
II
7
III
10
IV
15
V
17
VI
13
VII
14
VIII
14
XXI
52
XXII
54
XXIII
57
XXIV
60
XXV
62
XXVI
64
XXVII
66
XXVIII
68

IX
20
X
23
XI
25
XII
28
XIII
31
XIV
33
XV
39
XVI
42
XVII
44
XVIII
47
XIX
49
XX
52
XXIX
71
XXX
73
XXXI
74
XXXII
76
XXXIII
79
XXXIV
82
XXXV
84
XXXVI
86
XXXVII
87
XXXVIII
90
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About the author (2000)

Frank X Walker is a native of Danville, Kentucky, and professor of English at the University of Kentucky. A former Kentucky poet laureate, he is founding member of the Affrilachian Poets. Walker created the word Affrilachia to help make visible the Black experience in the Appalachian South. He is the author of many poetry volumes, including Affrilachia, Buffalo Dance: The Journey of York, Black Box: Poems, When Winter Come: The Ascension of York, and Isaac Murphy: I Dedicate This Ride.

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