African American Mystery Writers: A Historical and Thematic Study

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McFarland, Nov 12, 2008 - Literary Criticism - 277 pages
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The book describes the movement by African American authors from slave narratives and antebellum newspapers into fiction writing, and the subsequent developments of black genre fiction through the present. It analyzes works by modern African American mystery writers, focusing on sleuths, the social locations of crime, victims and offenders, the notion of "doing justice," and the role of African American cultural vernacular in mystery fiction. A final section focuses on readers and reading, examining African American mystery writers' access to the marketplace and the issue of the "double audience" raised by earlier writers.
 

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Contents

Preface
1
Early Black Writers as Crime Reporters
5
Modern African American Mystery Writers
73
Readers Writers and Scholars
161
Concluding Thoughts
203
Appendix A
207
Appendix B
210
Appendix C
212
Appendix D
214
Appendix E
223
Appendix F
235
Notes
241
Bibliography
249
Index
267
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Frankie Y. Bailey is an associate professor in the University at Albany's School of Criminal Justice. She is a member of Mystery Writers of America and currently serves as the secretary and a director-at-large of the Board of Directors. She is also a member of Sisters in Crime and of Romance Writers of America.

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