African Anthropologies: History, Critique and Practice

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Mwenda Ntarangwi, David Mills, Mustafa Babiker
Zed Books, Aug 22, 2006 - Social Science - 274 pages
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This overview of the history, application and teaching of anthropology in post-colonial Africa shows how the continent's anthropologists are redefining the historical legacy of European and American disciplinary hegemony, and developing distinctively African contributions to anthropological theory and practice. The contributors illustrate the diverse national traditions of anthropological practice that have developed in sub-Saharan Africa since decolonization and exemplify the diversity of professional work carried out by the discipline's practitioners. Their commitment to a common disciplinary identity demonstrates the place that exists for a critical anthropology that is reflective about both its potentials and limitations.
 

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Contents

Histories of Training
1
The Teaching of Anthropology in Zimbabwe over
99
Forgetting Africa
139
Anthropological Knowledge
154
An Invisible Religion? Anthropologys Avoidance
188
The Nigerian Case
207
Reflections on the Challenges of Teaching Anthropology
214
Challenges and Prospects for Applied Anthropology
237
Index
267
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About the author (2006)

Mwenda Ntarangwi teaches anthropology at Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois, and is the author of Gender Identity and Performance (2003, Africa World Press). Mustafa Babiker teaches anthropology at the University of Khartoum. His research and development consultancies address issues of social change within pastoral communities. David Mills lectures at the University of Birmingham. He has just finished a book on the political history of British social anthropology.

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