African Development Indicators 2004

Front Cover
World Bank Publications, Jan 1, 2004 - Business & Economics - 397 pages
0 Reviews
African Development Indicators 2004 provides the most detailed collection of data on Africa available in one volume. It contains more than 500 macroeconomic, sectoral, and social indicators, covering 53 African countries with data from 1970-2002. The book is grouped into 15 chapters: background data; national accounts; prices and exchange rates; money and banking; external sector; external debt and related flows; government finance; agriculture; power, communications, and transportation; public enterprises; labor force and employment; aid flows; social indicators; environmental indicators; and HIPC debt initiative. Each chapter begins with a brief introduction on the nature of the data and their limitations, followed by a set of statistical tables, charts, and technical notes that define the indicators and identify their specific source. Included this year are new tables on HIV/AIDS, Communications and Transportation, and the HIPC Debt Initiative. Designed to provide all those interested in Africa with a focused and convenient set of data to monitor development programs and aid flows in the region, this is an invaluable reference tool for analysts and policymakers who want a better understanding of the economic and social developments occurring in Africa.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

African Development Indicators 2005: From The World Bank Africa Database (African Development Indicators) (African Development Indicators)

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Both this book and two CD-ROMs from World Bank are designed to provide anyone interested in Africa, especially analysts and policymakers, with accurate details on the current state of the impoverished ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 271 - Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau Kenya Lesotho Liberia Madagascar Malawi Mali Mauritania Mauritius Mozambique Namibia Niger Nigeria Rwanda Sao Tome...
Page 282 - Africa in the second half of the 1980s. For many countries, the foreign savings made available through ODA flows are equivalent to a sizable share of GDP and to the bulk of their domestic investment. Thus, monitoring aid flows is of special importance because of their significance to the economic performance of the region. The tables in this chapter show data on net ODA flows and their relative importance to key economic and demographic indicators in recipient countries, real growth in net ODA flows...
Page 333 - Refers to total enrolment in a specific level of education, regardless of age, expressed as a percentage of the...
Page 254 - Algeria Angola Benin Botswana Burkina Faso Burundi Cameroon Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad Comoros Congo...
Page 278 - ... the production of economic goods and services as defined by the United Nations systems of national accounts and balances during a specified time-reference period. According to these systems the production of economic goods and services includes all production and processing of primary products whether for the market, for barter or for own consumption, the production of all other goods and services for the market and, in the case of households which produce such goods and services for the market,...
Page 278 - The concept of earnings, as applied in wages statistics, relates to remuneration in ca'sh and in kind paid to employees, as a rule at regular intervals, for time worked or work done, together with remuneration for time not worked, such as for annual vacation, other paid leave or holidays. Earnings exclude employers...
Page 267 - I (1987), there are many persons who do not clearly come within one of these categories or the other. Many are visibly underemployed in that they work less than full time. Others work full time but earn less than a subsistence income. Some of the unemployed may even be voluntarily idle. The comparability of the data is further hampered by the fact that practices vary among countries as regards the treatment of such groups as armed forces, inmates of institutions, persons living on reservations, persons...
Page 287 - Algeria, Ecuador, Gabon, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Venezuela. The OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) comprises the NATO countries and Australia, Austria, Finland, Ireland, Japan, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. Countries classified as "developed...
Page 385 - Household. A household was defined as a group of persons who normally eat and live together. These people may or may not be related by blood, but make common provision for food or other essentials for living and they have only one person whom they all regard as the head of the household.
Page 349 - FAO defines a natural forest in tropical and temperate developing countries as a forest composed primarily of indigenous (native) tree species. Natural forests include closed forest, where trees cover a high proportion of the ground and where grass does not form a continuous layer on the forest floor (eg, broadleaved forests, coniferous forests, and bamboo forests), and open forest, which FAO defines as mixed forest/grasslands with at least 10 percent tree cover and a continuous grass layer on the...

Bibliographic information