African Filmmaking: North and South of the Sahara

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Indiana University Press, 2006 - History - 224 pages
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African cinema is a vibrant, diverse, and relatively new art form, which continues to draw the attention of an ever-expanding worldwide audience. African Filmmaking is the first comprehensive study in English linking filmmaking in the Maghreb with that in the 12 independent states of francophone West Africa. Roy Armes examines a wide range of issues common to filmmakers throughout the region: the socio-political context, filmmaking in Africa before the mid-1960s, the involvement of African and French governments, questions of national and cultural identity, the issue of globalization, and, especially, the work of the filmmakers themselves over the past 40 years, with particular emphasis on younger filmmakers. Armes offers a wealth of information and a unique perspective on the history and future of African filmmaking.
 

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Contents

THE AFRICAN EXPERIENCE
3
BEGINNINGS
21
AFRICAN INITIATIVES
36
THE FRENCH CONNECTION
53
LIBERATION AND POSTCOLONIAL SOCIETY
67
INDIVIDUAL STRUGGLE
87
EXPERIMENTAL NARRATIVES
109
EXEMPLARY TALES
122
MAHAMAT SALEH HAROUN CHAD
158
DANI KOUYATÉ BURKINA FASO
167
RAJA AMARI TUNISIA
176
FAOUZI BENSAIDI MOROCCO
183
ABDERRAHMANE SISSAKO MAURITANIA
191
BIBLIOGRAPHY
201
INDEX
215
Copyright

THE POSTINDEPENDENCE GENERATION
143

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About the author (2006)

Roy Armes is Professor Emeritus of Film at Middlesex University in London. His recent books include Third World Film Making and the West, Arab and African Film Making. Dictionary of North African Film Makers, and Omar Gatlato.

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