African pastoralism: conflict, institutions and government

Front Cover
Pluto Press in association with OSSREA, 2001 - Business & Economics - 311 pages
0 Reviews
Although many countries in Africa are devastated by poverty and famine, and are desperately in need of aid, it is generally recognized that programs of aid and development in Africa are imposed upon local communities with little regard for their traditional values and way of life. This is true of development schemes imposed by national African governments, just as it is true of international aid schemes.This book provides a fresh look at these intricate issues, and explores the way in which farming and traditional pastoral livelihoods have strengthened rather than weakened in the face of government reforms. It reveals how traditional institutions and resource management strategies within local African communities continue to endure, in spite of the enormous pressure the development programs exert. Revealing the link between the structure of power relations in pastoral societies and the shrinking of environmental space, the contributors demonstrate the intractable problems of the sustainability of pastoral development in situations characterized by increasing land appropriation and conflicts over resources. The book introduces thirteen case studies from Botswana, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan and Uganda and various other parts of the African continent.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Towards Security Stability and Sustainability Oriented
23
Sustainable Development and Resource Conflicts in Botswana
39
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2001)

Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Khartoum.