Africans in America: America's Journey Through Slavery

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1999 - History - 494 pages
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A riveting narrative history of America, from the 1607 landing in Jamestown to the brink of the Civil War, Africans in America tells the shared history of Africans and Europeans as seen through the lens of slavery. It is told from the point of view of the Africans who arrived in shackles and endured the terrible dichotomy of this new land founded on the ideal of liberty but dedicated to the perpetuation of slavery. Meticulously researched, this book weaves together the experiences of the colonists, slaves, free and fugitive blacks, and abolitionists to present an utterly original document, a startling and moving drama of the effects of slavery and racism on our conflicted national identity. The result transcends history as we were taught it and transforms the way we see our past.
 

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AFRICANS IN AMER 4K

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In this companion to the PBS-TV series, reader Iona Morris breathes life into the exploration of the roots of slavery in Africa and its expansion to Europe and eventually America. The slavery system ... Read full review

Africans in America: America's journey through slavery

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Recently, there has been a spate of books on the issue of slavery. Drawing on tapes made by the Federal Writers Project in the 1930s and 1940s, Remembering Slavery (LJ 9/1/98) records the history of ... Read full review

Contents

Prologue I
1
PART ONETerrible Transformation
13
PART TWORevolution
113
PART THREEBrotherly Love
213
PART FOURJudgment
319
Notes
447
Acknowledgments
475
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About the author (1999)

Charles Johnson, recipient of a 1998 MacArthur Foundation Award, is the author of five works of fiction, including the recently published Dreamer. He has received many honors and awards, including the National Book Award. He is the S. Wilson and Grace M. Pollock Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Washington.

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