After London

Front Cover
BoD – Books on Demand, 2013 - 300 pages
0 Reviews
After a sudden catastrophe has depopulated England, the countryside reverts to nature, and the few survivors return to a quasi-medieval way of life. Several years later, in the wild landscape, the adventures of Sir Felix Aquila, a young nobleman searching for his role in life, take place. Reprint of the novel originally published in 1885.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

THE RELAPSE INTO BARBARISM
1
WILD ANIMALS
12
MEN OF THE WOODS
18
THE INVADERS
30
THE LAKE
41
WILD ENGLAND
53
THE HOUSE OF AQUILA
61
THE STOCKADE
71
SAILING AWAY
158
THE STRAITS
166
SAILING ONWARDS
173
THE CITY
181
THE CAMP
189
THE KINGS LEVY
199
FIGHTING
207
IN DANGER
216

THE CANOE
80
BARON AQUILA
90
THE FOREST TRACK
99
THE FOREST TRACK CONTINUED
110
THYMA CASTLE
118
SUPERSTITIONS
128
THE FEAST
137
AURORA
144
NIGHT IN THE FOREST
150
A VOYAGE
226
DISCOVERIES
236
STRANGE THINGS
244
FIERY VAPOURS
251
THE SHEPHERDS
259
BOW AND ARROW
268
SURPRISED
275
FOR AURORA
283
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)

John Richard Jefferies (6 November 1848 - 14 August 1887) was an English nature writer, noted for his depiction of English rural life in essays, books of natural history, and novels. His childhood on a small Wiltshire farm had a great influence on him and provides the background to all his major works of fiction. For all that, these show a remarkable diversity, including Bevis (1882), a classic children's book, and After London (1885), an early work of science fiction. For much of his adult life, he suffered from tuberculosis, and his struggles with the illness and with poverty also play a role in his writing. Jefferies valued and cultivated an intensity of feeling in his experience of the world around him, a cultivation that he describes in detail in The Story of My Heart (1883). This work, an introspective depiction of his thoughts and feelings on the world, gained him the reputation of a nature mystic at the time. But it is his success in conveying his awareness of nature and people within it, both in his fiction and in essay collections such as The Amateur Poacher (1879) and Round About a Great Estate (1880), that has drawn most admirers. Walter Besant wrote of his reaction on first reading Jefferies: "Why, we must have been blind all our lives; here were the most wonderful things possible going on under our very noses, but we saw them not.

Bibliographic information