Afterglow of Creation: From the Fireball to the Discovery of Cosmic Ripples

Front Cover
University Science Books, 1996 - Science - 222 pages
1 Review
This is the story of the cosmic background radiation, the "afterglow" of the Big Bang in which the Universe was born. Fifteen billion years after the event, the afterglow still permeates all of space, making it the oldest relic in creation and providing an imprint of the Universe as it was in its infancy. But the most astonishing thing about the afterglow of creation is that it wasn't discovered until 1965, and then only by accident - despite the fact that it had been predicted in 1948 and the technology to detect it existed during World War II. Chown brilliantly weaves a tale of the search for the origins of the Universe. Beginning in the 1920s and culminating with the flight of the COBE satellite and what it found, this book uncovers the secrets of the Universe.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Afterglow of creation: from the fireball to the discovery of cosmic ripples

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Throughout the 20th century, cosmological theory has been significantly revised every five to ten years. Chown's book, first published in England, is excellent for lay readers trying to keep up with ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
THE TOUGHEST MEASUREMENT IN SCIENCE
7
The Restless Universe
21
The Primeval Fireball
35
Taking the Temperature of the Universe
51
The Ghost Signal at 4080 Megacycles
65
A Tale of Two Telephone Calls
79
Afterglow of Creation
93
Bumps But No Wiggles
125
THE GOLDEN AGE OF COSMOLOGY
137
The NineMinute Spectrum
155
Cosmic Ripples
165
The Hype and the Hysteria
173
The Universe According to COBE
185
The Golden Age of Cosmology
201
INDEX
219

The Toughest Measurement in Science
111

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1996)

Marcus Chown is an award-winning writer and broadcaster. Formerly a radio astronomer at the California Institute of Technology, he is now cosmology consultant for "New Scientist" magazine. He lives in London, England.

Bibliographic information