Aggregate and Industry-Level Productivity Analyses

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Ali Dogramaci, Nabil R. Adam
Springer Science & Business Media, Mar 31, 1981 - Business & Economics - 195 pages
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1 Ali Dogramaci and Nabil R. Adam 1.1. OVERVIEW With the decline of U.S. productivity growth, interest has surged to under stand the behavior of productivity measures through time, the conceptual foundations of productivity analysis, and the linkage between productivity performance and other major forces in the economy. The purpose of this volume is to present a brief overview of some of the concepts used in aggre gate and industry-level productivity analyses and the results of some of the recent research in this field. The book is divided into three parts. Part I covers some of the methodo logical approaches used in aggregate and industry-level productivity studies. Part II deals with the movement of labor productivity measures through time. The papers in this part of the book study productivity changes as uni variate time series and analyze some of the characteristics of the patterns displayed. The papers in Part III address the issues of measurement of capi tal, the relation of capital formation to productivity growth, and the rela tion of imported intermediate inputs to U.S. productivity performance.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
12 The Issues under Analysis
2
References
4
METHODOLOGICAL APPROACHES
5
Methodological Issues in Aggregate Productivity Analysis
7
22 The Separability Assumption
8
23 Productivity and Technical Change
9
24 Total Factor Productivity Indexes
10
54 Behavior of the Autoregressive Representation
85
55 Predictions for 19751978
87
56 Conclusions
88
References
89
MEASUREMENT ISSUES AND PRODUCTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS
91
Technical Change Capital Investment and Productivity in US Metalworking Industries
93
62 Characteristics of the Metalworking Industry
96
63 Capital Investment and Productivity Advance in Metalworking
97

25 Unbiased and Unique Discrete Approximations to TFP Indexes
12
26 Aggregation Biases
13
27 Value Added versus Gross Output
14
28 The Concept and Measurement of Capital
15
29 Productivity Indexes and Production Finctions
17
210 Production Functions Cost Functions and Productivity Change
20
Some Applications
23
212 Concluding Remarks
26
References
27
Technological Change and Productivity in InputOutput Analysis and the Potential of Sectoral Optimization Models
31
32 Leontief InputOutput Models
32
33 Technological Change Productivity Adjustment and Structural Change in an InputOutput Systems
34
34 Optimization of InputOutput Systems
36
35 Representation of Technology in InputOutput Systems
38
36 Sectoral Optimization and Structural Change of an InputOutput System
43
37 Concluding Remarks
47
Notes
48
References
49
LABOR PRODUCTIVITY PATTERNS THROUGH TIME
51
On the Interpretation of Industry Productivity Indexes
53
42 The Productivity Index and Production Functions
55
43 The Production Function as Model
58
44 The Observable Patterns
62
45 The Patterns and Productivity
69
46 Discussion
74
47 Conclusion
75
References
76
The Asymmetric Behavior of Labor Productivity during the business Cycle
77
52 The Background
78
53 The Data
81
64 PostWorld War II Developments in Machine Tools
101
65 The Economics of Investment in Machine Tools
109
66 The Current Period
113
67 Summary
115
Sources and Methods of Table 612
118
Notes
120
The Role of Capital Formation in the Recent Slowdown in Productivity Growth
122
72 Capital Formation in the Nonfarm Business Sector
123
73 Measurement of Capital Input
126
74 Aggregation of the Elements of the Capital Stock
128
75 Growth of the CapitalLabor Ratio
132
76 The Link between Capital Formation and Labor Productivity
133
77 Capital Productivity Movements
136
78 Conclusions
138
Separability Tests with the Translog Production Function
139
The Effect of Pollution Control Investment on the Growth of Capital Stock
142
Notes
144
References
147
Imported Intermediate Input Its Impact on Sectoral Productivity in US Manufacturing
149
82 Sectoral Production and Technical Change
151
83 Factor Augmentation
154
84 Estimating Model
158
85 Data Base
163
86 Findings
169
87 Conclusion
183
References
185
Name Index
187
Subject Index
191
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