Agnosticism and Theism in the Nineteenth Century: An Historical Study of Religious Thought

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P. Green, 1905 - Agnosticism - 207 pages
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Page 50 - Evolution is an integration of matter and concomitant dissipation of motion ; during which the matter passes from an indefinite, incoherent homogeneity to a definite, coherent heterogeneity ; and during •which the retained motion undergoes a parallel transformation.
Page 99 - Children of men ! the unseen Power, whose eye For ever doth accompany mankind, Hath look'd on no religion scornfully That men did ever find. ' Which has not taught weak wills how much they can ? Which has not fall'n on the dry heart like rain ? Which has not cried to sunk, self-weary man : Thou must be born again...
Page 39 - To me the Universe was all void of Life, of Purpose, of Volition, even of Hostility: it was one huge, dead, immeasurable Steam-engine, rolling on, in its dead indifference, to grind me limb from limb.
Page 82 - This principle may be stated in various ways, but they all amount to this : that it is wrong for a man to say that he is certain of the objective truth of any proposition unless he can produce evidence which logically justifies that certainty. This is what Agnosticism asserts ; and, in my opinion, it is all that is essential to Agnosticism.
Page 34 - I think it must be allowed that, in the present state of our knowledge, the adaptations in Nature afford a large balance of probability in favour of creation by intelligence.
Page 88 - The absolute justice of the system of things is as clear to me as any scientific fact. The gravitation of sin to sorrow is as certain as that of the earth to the sun, and more so — for experimental proof of the fact is within reach of us all — nay is before us all in our own lives, if we had but the eyes to see it.
Page 100 - Which has not taught weak wills how much they can ? Which has not fall'n on the dry heart like rain ? Which has not cried to sunk, self-weary man : Thou must be born again ! ' Children of men ! not that your age excel In pride of life the ages of your sires, But that ye think clear, feel deep, bear fruit well, The Friend of man desires.
Page 35 - A Being of great but limited power, how or by what limited we cannot even conjecture; of great, and perhaps unlimited intelligence, but perhaps, also, more narrowly limited than his power: who desires, and pays some regard to, the happiness of his creatures, but who seems to have other motives of action which he cares more for, and who can hardly be supposed to have created the universe for that purpose alone.
Page 167 - As we observe the conditions of the body, we have nature on our side : as we observe the law of the soul, we have God on our side. He imparts truth to all men who observe these conditions...
Page 88 - ... as much ethical as intellectual. This principle may be stated in various ways, but they all amount to this : that it is wrong for a man to say that he is certain of the objective truth of any proposition unless he can produce evidence which logically justifies that certainty.

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