Aiding Recovery?: The Crisis of Aid in Chronic Political Emergencies

Front Cover
Zed Books, 2001 - Business & Economics - 191 pages
0 Reviews
In this important study of aid policy, Joanna Macrae argues that the disintegration of state authority and civil order has created acute problems in precisely those countries that need aid most. In a number of developing countries--including Cambodia, Uganda, and Kosovo--international aid no longer assumes the existence of stable, sovereign states capable of making policy. Instead, the major donor agencies have usually responded by suspending development aid and substituting some type of emergency aid or relief assistance. Now, as she shows, there are calls to make relief more development-oriented, and more focused on the underlying conflicts which cause these crises.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
194589
7
The Emergence of a New
24
An Overview of War and its Impact
48
Aid in a Vacuum
73
The Sustainability Dilemma
120
systems and strategies of rehabilitation
143
chronic political emergencies 155 Linking relief
158
References
173
Index
186
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2001)

Joanna Macrae is a Research Fellow at the Overseas Development Institute. Over the past decade she has conducted a wide range of research and evaluations looking at how aid works in conflict settings, and how these responses reflect wider changes in international relations. In addition to extensive work on donor policy in this area, she has also conducted fieldwork in the Balkans, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Sudan and West Africa. She is Co- Editor, with Anthony Zwi of War and Hunger: Rethinking International Responses to Complex Emergencies, and with Helen Young of Disasters: the journal of disaster studies, policy and management.

Bibliographic information