Alan Turing and His Contemporaries: Building the World's First Computers

Front Cover
Simon Lavington
BCS, The Chartered Institute, 2012 - Biography & Autobiography - 111 pages
Secret wartime projects in code-breaking, radar and ballistics produced a wealth of ideas and technologies that kick-started the development of digital computers. This is the story of the people and projects that flourished in the post-war period. By 1955 computers had begun to appear in the market-place. The Information Age was dawning and Alan Turing and his contemporaries held centre stage. Their influence is still discernable deep down within today's hardware and software.
 

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Contents

1 THE IDEAS MEN
1
2 ACES AND DEUCES
11
3 IVORY TOWERS AND TEA ROOMS
21
4 THE MANCHESTER MACHINES
33
5 MEANWHILE IN DEEPEST HERTFORDSHIRE
47
6 ONE MAN IN A BARN
59
7 INTO THE MARKETPLACE
69
THE LEGACY OF TURING AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES
79
TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF FIVE EARLY BRITISH COMPUTERS
85
TURING AND COMPUTING A TIMELINE
95
FURTHER READING
105
INDEX
109
Back Cover
112
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About the author (2012)

Chris Burton is one of the world's leading restorers of historic computers. Professor Martin Campbell-Kelly is the UK's foremost computer historian. Dr Roger Johnson is a past President of the British Computer Society. Professor Simon Lavington is the Computer Conservation Society's digital Archivist. All are committee members of the Computer Conservation Society.

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