Albert and Victoria: The Rise and Fall of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha

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A&C Black, 2006 - History - 299 pages
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When Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha married his cousin, the young Queen Victoria, in 1840, it was not only a match whose fertility and personal devotion provided a model for the queen's subjects, it was also a triumph of dynastic politics. It drew the couple deeply into European politics, where their personal and family relationships with many of the rulers often had repercussions at home. Despite the death of Albert in 1861, the marriage of Victoria's children into Europe's royal houses continued the dynastic theme. It was a tragedy for Germany and Europe that Vicky, Victoria's eldest daughter, and her husband, the heir to the German throne were unable to master Bismarck. Albert and Victoria is a portrait of a marriage. It also traces Albert to his unhappy family roots in Coburg and shows how important his attitudes, most of them shared by Victoria, were in their joint dynastic enterprise. >
 

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Contents

Victoria
1
Coburg
21
Queen and Consort
47
Controversy and Conflict
69
Triumph and Calumny
97
The Prussian Marriage
121
The Widowed Queen
143
The Matriarch of Monarchs
171
Bertie and the Kaiser
193
Notes
279
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About the author (2006)

Edgar Feuchtwanger has published many books on English and European history, among them biographies of Gladstone, Disraeli and Bismarck. His volume Queen Victoria and Her Age has appeared in German translation, and he has written about the Nazi rise to power in From Weimar to Hitler.

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