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Cozzzzzo & 6 o' Zoo,
TO PROFESSORS AND TUT RS OF GREEK AND OTHERs.
. o , Zazocco. -
THE following works by President Woolsey’of Yale College have,
during the present year, been carefully ex ed by him, assisted by
Prof. Packard, all desirable changes have been made, and a new set of
references to Prof. Hadley's Greek Grammar, added:

ALCESTIS OF EURIPIDES, with notes, for the use of Colleges in the United States.

ANTIGONE OF SOPHOCLES, with notes, for the use of Colleges in the United States.

PROMETHEUS OF AFSCHYLUS, with notes, for the use of Colleges in the United States.

ELECTRA OF SOPHOCLES, with notes, for the use of Colleges in
the United States.

GORGIAS OF PLATO, with notes, for the use of Colleges in the
United States.

September, 1869.

ENTERED according to Act of Congress, in the year 1869, by
H A M E R S L E Y AND COMPANY.,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the District of Connecticut.

WALUABLE B00KS,

SOPHOCLES FIRST BOOK IN GREEK, for the use of beginners.

SOPHOCLES GREEK LESSONS, new edition, adapted to the revised
edition of the Author's Greek Grammar.

SOPHOCLES GRAMMAR, revised edition, for the use of Schools and
Colleges.

SOPHOCLES GREEK EXERCISES, with an English and Greek
vocabulary.

SOPHOCLES GREEK GRAMMAR, for the use of learners, being the
first edition of the Author's Grammar. -

FELTON'S GREEK READER, containing selections in Prose and
Poetry, with notes, a Lexicon and references to the Grammars of Pross.
Sophocles, Hadley and Crosby.

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The Alcestis has a high rank, both for style and subject, among the plays of Euripides. Its style places it in the class with the Medea, Hippolytus, and Heraclidae, which were probably written before the other extant pieces of their author. Of these four plays, Elmsley says, in his notes on the argument of Medea (p. 69, ed. Oxf.): “Numeros habent severiores et puriores, a quorum drpuffeta absunt caeterae omnes, aliae quidem propius, ut Hecuba, aliae vero longius, ut Orestes.” While in those tragedies of Euripides which are undoubtedly his later ones there may be discovered negligence of composition, want of simplicity, especially in choral parts, and a style very remote from the severity of Sophocles, the simplicity of the Alcestis must, I think, strike even the careless reader; and the lyric parts have an elegant sweetness about them, which can hardly be paralleled by those of any of his other dramas.

The subject of this play presents us with an uncommon example of self-devotion and of conjugal love, and recalls to the mind those words of St. Paul, fitted to awaken hal lowed thoughts in every breast: “Peradventure for a good man some one would even dare to die.” “On the score of beautiful morality,” says A. W. von Schlegel, “there is none of the pieces of Euripides so deserving of praise as Alcestis. Her determination to die, and the farewell which

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