Alexis de Tocqueville on Democracy, Revolution, and Society

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University of Chicago Press, Sep 15, 1982 - Political Science - 391 pages
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Alexis de Tocqueville possessed one of the most fertile sociological imaginations of the nineteenth century. For more than 120 years, his uncanny predictive insight has continued to fascinate thinkers, and his writings have continued to influence our interpretations of history and society. His analyses of many issues remain relevant to current social and political problems. In this volume John Stone and Stephen Mennell bring together for the first time selections from the full range of Tocqueville's writings, selections that illustrate the depth of his insight and analysis.
 

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Contents

The Social Origins of Democracy
47
The Political Structure of Democracy
78
Social Relations under Democracy
102
The Cultural Consequences of Democracy
130
The Ancien Regime and the Origins of the French
163
the French Revolution Accomplish?
170
Administrative Centralization under the Ancien
181
How Paternal Government as It Is Called Today
187
The Revolution of 1848 and Its Aftermath
250
Individualism Alienation and Deviance
280
Race Relations Slavery and Colonialism
320
Centralization Equality
348
The Tendency towards Political Centralization
361
Democratic Despotism
373
Bibliography
381
Index
387

The Dynamics of Revolution
215

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About the author (1982)

John Stone is professor of sociology and Chairman of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at George Mason University. Stephen Mennell is professor of sociology and Chairman of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Monash University, Australia.

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