Alice 2.0: introductory concepts and techniques

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Thomson Course Technology, Nov 15, 2006 - Computers - 248 pages
Alice 2.0: Introductory Concepts and Techniques, from the Shelly Cashman Series, is designed to teach introductory programming concepts with Alice 2.0. Alice is free, downloadable software that was developed with funding from the National Science Foundation to make object-oriented programming concepts more accessible and exciting to students. This new book on Alice 2.0 provides the perfect approach to teaching this software to students. With its project-oriented, step-by-step pedagogy, students will easily grasp programming concepts and build confidence in their skills.

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Contents

What Is Alice?
2
The Main Work Areas of the Alice Interface
11
Other Elements of the Alice Interface
17
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Gary B. Shelly wrote and published his first computer education textbook in 1969. More than twenty million copies of Shelly Cashman Series? textbooks have been sold. Gary and a talented group of contributing authors have produced books on computer programming, computer concepts, and application software that are the leading textbooks in the computer technology market today. Gary has hosted the annual Shelly Cashman Series? Institute, a week-long training event focusing on the latest topics in technology, for the past 34 years.

Thomas J. Cashman received his education at California State University, Los Angeles. He established one of the first business data processing programs in the U.S. at Long Beach City College in California, where he taught and served as department head. In 1969, he began collaborating with now best-selling author, Gary Shelly.

Charles W. Herbert has been teaching Computer Science and Computer Information Systems at Community College of Philadelphia since 1984, where he has served as the Chair of the CIS Department, Director of Computer Science, and Director of Technical Education. He has worked extensively as a professional programmer. Using his background in curriculum development, he is currently a Principal Investigator for an NSF funded team exploring the use of virtual reality programming in community college computing courses. He is the co-author of Alice 2.0: Introductory Concepts and Techniques.