Alice Adams

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1st World Publishing, Sep 20, 2005 - Fiction - 328 pages
1 Review
Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - The patient, an old-fashioned man, thought the nurse made a mistake in keeping both of the windows open, and her sprightly disregard of his protests added something to his hatred of her. Every evening he told her that anybody with ordinary gumption ought to realize that night air was bad for the human frame. "The human frame won't stand everything, Miss Perry," he warned her, resentfully. "Even a child, if it had just ordinary gumption, ought to know enough not to let the night air blow on sick people yes, nor well people, either! 'Keep out of the night air, no matter how well you feel.' That's what my mother used to tell me when I was a boy. 'Keep out of the night air, Virgil, ' she'd say. 'Keep out of the night air.'"
 

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Review: Alice Adams

User Review  - Kaylan Swearingen - Goodreads

I wavered between sympathy and intense dislike (and embarrassment, occasionally) for the title character of this book. In the end, Alice proves herself to be a good girl who's learned quite a lesson ... Read full review

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Contents

CHAPTER I
5
CHAPTER II
12
CHAPTER III
23
CHAPTER IV
33
CHAPTER V
42
CHAPTER VI
54
CHAPTER VII
72
CHAPTER VIII
84
CHAPTER XIV
165
CHAPTER XV
180
CHAPTER XVI
194
CHAPTER XVII
206
CHAPTER XVIII
217
CHAPTER XIX
229
CHAPTER XX
242
CHAPTER XXI
257

CHAPTER IX
94
CHAPTER X
105
CHAPTER XI
117
CHAPTER XII
132
CHAPTER XIII
154
CHAPTER XXII
274
CHAPTER XXIII
289
CHAPTER XXIV
304
CHAPTER XXV
312
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About the author (2005)

Newton Booth Tarkington was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on July 29, 1869. He was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy, than spent his first two years of college at Purdue University and his last two at Princeton University. When his class graduated in 1893, he lacked sufficient credits for a degree. Upon leaving Princeton, he returned to Indiana determined to pursue a career as a writer. Tarkington was an early member of The Dramatic Club, founded in 1889, and often wrote plays and directed and acted in its productions. After a five-year apprenticeship full of publishers' rejection slips, Tarkington enjoyed a huge commercial success with The Gentleman from Indiana, which was published in 1899. He produced a total of 171 short stories, 21 novels, 9 novellas, and 19 plays along with a number of movie scripts, radio dramas, and even illustrations over the course of a career that lasted from 1899 until his death in 1946. His novels included Monsieur Beaucaire, The Flirt, Seventeen, Gentle Julia, and The Turmoil. He won the Pulitzer Prize in fiction in 1919 and 1922 for his novels The Magnificent Ambersons and Alice Adams. He used the political knowledge he acquired while serving one term in the Indiana House of Representatives in the short story collection In the Arena. In collaboration with dramatist Harry Leon Wilson, Tarkington wrote The Man from Home, the first of many successful Broadway plays. He wrote children's stories in the final phase of his career. He died on May 19, 1946 after an illness.

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