Alienation After Derrida

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A&C Black, May 15, 2010 - Philosophy - 234 pages
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Alienation After Derrida rearticulates the Hegelian-Marxist theory of alienation in the light of Derrida's deconstruction of the metaphysics of presence. Simon Skempton aims to demonstrate in what way Derridian deconstruction can itself be said to be a critique of alienation. In so doing, he argues that the acceptance of Derrida's deconstructive concepts does not necessarily entail the acceptance of his interpretations of Hegel and Marx. In this way the book proposes radical reinterpretations, not only of Hegel and Marx, but of Derridian deconstruction itself.

The critique of the notions of alienation and de-alienation is a key component of Derridian deconstruction that has been largely neglected by scholars to date. This important new study puts forward a unique and original argument that Derridian deconstruction can itself provide the basis for a rethinking of the concept of alienation, a concept that has received little serious philosophically engaged attention for several decades.
 

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Contents

Derrida and Alienation
1
A Historical Sketch
21
2 Difference and Alienation in Hegel
49
3 Determinability and Objectification in Marx
96
4 Heideggers Deconstruction of Ontological Alienation
127
5 Deconstructive Dealienation
160
Conclusion
193
Notes
203
Bibliography
221
Index
227
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About the author (2010)

Simon Skempton has a PhD in Philosophy from Middlesex University, UK. He currently teaches Philosophy and Intellectual History at the State University - Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia.

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