All Else Is Bondage: Non-Volitional Living

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Sentient Publications, 2004 - Religion - 75 pages
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These thirty-four powerful essays, poems, and dialogs based on Taoist and Buddhist thought constitute a guide to what the author calls 'non-volitional living' -- the ancient understanding that our efforts to grasp our true nature are futile. While this may sound disheartening, fully comprehending this truth is the key to our liberation. This final volume in the author's output of eight books will make his many fans' collections of his works complete. The pseudonymous author, one of the earliest and most original interpreters of Buddhism, belongs with Reps, Watts, and Kapleau on the bookshelves of serious students of Eastern spiritual thought.
 

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Contents

II
1
III
5
IV
9
VI
10
VII
11
IX
13
X
14
XI
15
XIX
27
XX
28
XXI
35
XXII
37
XXIII
38
XXIV
40
XXV
45
XXVI
47

XII
17
XIII
18
XIV
19
XV
22
XVI
24
XVII
25
XVIII
26
XXVIII
51
XXIX
54
XXX
57
XXXI
59
XXXII
60
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About the author (2004)

The identity of Wei Wu Wei was not revealed at the time of the publication of his first book. But we now know a few background details that help put the writings into context. He was born in 1895 into a well-established Irish family, was raised on an estate outside Cambridge, England, and went to Oxford. Early in life, he pursued an interest in Egyptology. This was followed by a period of involvement in the arts in Britain in the 1920s and 1930s. Having exhausted his interest in this field, he turned to philosophy and metaphysics, traveling throughout Asia and spending time at the ashram of Sri Ramana Maharshi. In 1958, at the age of 63, he saw the first of the Wei Wu Wei titles published. Over the next 16 years, seven more were published, including his final work under the new pseudonym O.O.O. During most of this later period, he maintained a residence with his wife in Monaco. He is believed to have known, among others, Lama Anagarika Govinda, Dr. Hubert Benoit, John Blofeld, Douglas Harding, Arthur Osborne, and Dr. D. T. Suzuki. He died in 1986 at the age of 90.

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