All Scientists Now: The Royal Society in the Nineteenth Century

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 20, 2002 - Business & Economics - 276 pages
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The history of the Royal Society in the nineteenth century is published as a full-length account for the first time in this book. Dr Marie Boas Hall has meticulously explored this fascinating period, using the Royal Society's own records. In 1800 the Royal Society was a leisurely club for scientists, scholars/politicians and patrons of science and learning. More important, it was a centre for improving knowledge of the natural sciences, and adviser to the Government on scientific matters. The first half of the book describes the manner of transition; the struggles and controversies among the most eminent scientists of the day. The second half concerns the emergence of the Royal Society as once again a leader of scientific opinion, as the recognised intermediary between science and Government, and as the chief advisory body to the Government. In the nineteenth century it became, in fact, the national academy of science.
 

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Contents

The eighteenthcentury legacy
1
Trial and error 18201830
16
Reform and revision 18301848
63
How reform worked the running of the Society 18481899
92
The encouragement of science
143
Relations with Government
162
Relations with other societies
182
The encouragement of scientific exploration
199
The end of the century a truly scientific society
216
A note on sources
221
Notes to the text
223
Bibliography
247
Index
251
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