All You Need to Know About the Movie and TV Business

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Simon and Schuster, Feb 6, 1996 - Performing Arts - 335 pages
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From getting the necessary training and understanding the intricate responsibilities of everyone behind or in front of the camera to getting your first break and avoiding career-specific pitfalls, All You Need to Know About the Movie and TV Business leads you topic by topic through
* A breakdown of job descriptions, from casting directors and key grips to stunt coordinators and film editors
* What kinds of deals actors, directors, writers, and producers make when they start out and when they hit the top
* How to protect and sell your creative work
* How movie deals are put together at studios and by independents
* The nuts and bolts of a boilerplate contract
* The notorious and mysterious world of profit participations, with a detailed explanation of why there's never any profit "net profit" deals
The entertainment industry can be an exciting, challenging landscape to negotiate. Having some valuable insight into how to make the most of your career in the movie or TV business can put you on the surest path to success.
 

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Contents

Introduction What It Takes to Work in the Movie
21
Chapter 1
27
Section
33
Chapter 21
40
Chapter 3
54
Chapter 4
79
Chapter 14
89
Section Three
93
Chapter 18
164
Chapter 11
176
Exploiting the Break
183
Avoid Being Exploited
202
2
212
Chapter
215
Section Seven
235
So What Is in That Boilerplate?
281

3
113
Chapter 6
120
Chapter 8
140
Unions
144
Section Four
155
Chapter 19
296
Television Production
316
Chapter 22
324
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Gail Resnik specialized in copyright and film and television production in her ten years of Paramount Pictures, where she handled business and legal affairs on Entertainment Tonight and served as senior production attorney on major motion pictures. She currently resides in Seattle, where she acts as a consultant on entertainment and multimedia law.

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