All about Hawaii: The Recognized Book of Authentic Information on Hawaii, Combined with Thrum's Hawaiian Annual and Standard Guide, Volume 26

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Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 1900 - Almanacs, Hawaiian
 

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Page 141 - ... father, whose name was Waiku. Waikelenuiaiku was much beloved by his father, but his brethren hated him. On account of their hatred they carried him and cast him into a pit belonging to Holonaeole. The oldest brother had pity on him, and gave charge to Holonaeole to take good care of him. Waikelenuiaiku escaped and fled to a country over which reigned a king whose name was Kamohoalii. There he was thrown into a dark place, a pit under ground, in which many persons were confined for various crimes....
Page 72 - I will say that it appears to me that little fear need be entertained in regard to tl'r. introduction of scale and other insects, since we have here an abundance of parasites and predatory insects preying upon and keeping the same in check. Strict attention, however, should be paid toward guarding against the introduction of Melolontid, Elateria beetles, etc., destructive to living roots of plants, as well as to any fungoid diseases destructive to vegetation that are liable to reach the islands with...
Page 139 - Moku,' the royal vessel, in which he and his family, consisting of his wife Lilinoe, his three sons and their wives were saved. When the flood subsided, Kane, Ku and Lono entered the waa halau of Nuu, and told him to go out. He did so and found himself on the top of Mauna Kea (the highest mountain on the island of Hawaii). He called a cave there after the name of his wife, and the cave remains there to this day as the legend says in testimony of the fact. Other versions of the legend say that Nuu...
Page 64 - ... production of Louisiana. The area of arable lands used in growing sugar in Hawaii may be deduced from the figures in the following table, which also shows the annual production of sugar : Annual production of Sugar in Hawaii. The average number of acres of cane manufactured for the three years given was 52,318. As the crop requires most of two years to mature, and as two crops are always in course, of growth at the same time, it is seen that the acreage under cane is not less than 105,000 acres....
Page 64 - On an average two years are required to make a crop of sugar in Hawaii, while only one year is required in Louisiana, so that the sum of the Hawaiian yield requires to be cut in two in order to compare it more accurately with the annual production of Louisiana. The area of arable lands used in growing sugar in Hawaii may be deduced from the figures in the following table, which also shows the annual production of sugar: Annual production of sugar in Hatraii.
Page 82 - O^ their fuel, and require but little medical attention ; work stopped by weather stops also the wages." These conditions are partly similar, but less favorable than corresponding conditions on Hawaiian plantations, the difference being decidedly in favor of the Hawaiian laborer. Again, the Hawaiian laborer requires less clothing, and, what is more important, he does not need to lose one day in the year from the weather. These considerations cause the comparison to be drawn as follows : Comparison...
Page 72 - Several of these individual efforts have not only resulted iii great benefit to the localities where the experiments have been made, but they are serving as object lessons, showing the immediate need of inclosing given forest areas and defending them against the action of cattle, thus allowing the depleted undergrowth and trees to come up again, a result which has followed in every case where inclosure has been adopted. Local efforts, however, do not meet the demands of the forest question from the...
Page 60 - Leaving the sea levd, the air temperature falls with increasing altitude ; in certain ascertained locations it falls at the rate of 1 F. for each 200 feet. The rate of decrease of temperature, however, is very variable, being affected by such factors as prevailing winds, open or forest-covered areas, level or extremely broken up land surfaces, and the prevalence of deep valleys and alternating ridges. Due to these factors, climate is extremely local, varying with the prevalence of conditions confined...
Page 140 - Then Lua-nuu and his son Kupulu-pulu-a-Nuu and his servant Pili-lua-nuu, started off in their boat to the eastward. In remembrance of this event the Hawaiians called the back of Kualoa, Koolau, Oahu, after one of Lua-nuu's names, Kane-hoa-lani, and the smaller hills in front of it were named Kupulu-pulu and Pili-lua-nuu.
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