All the Way to Heaven: The Selected Letters of Dorothy Day

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Marquette University Press, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography - 456 pages
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This volume, which extends from the early 1920s until the time of her death in 1980, offers a fascinating chronicle of her response to the vast changes in America, the Church, and the wider world. Set against the backdrop of the Depression, World War II, the Cold War, Vatican II, Vietnam, and the protests of the 1960s and {u2019}70s, she corresponded with a wide range of friends, colleagues, family members, and well-known figures such as Thomas Merton, Daniel Berrigan, César Chávez, Allen Ginsberg, Katherine Anne Porter, and Francis Cardinal Spellman, shedding light on the deepest yearnings of her heart. At the same time, the first publication of her early love letters to Forster Batterham highlight her humanity and poignantly dramatize the sacrifices that underlay her vocation.

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About the author (2010)

After leading a bohemian life as a young woman, Day turned to the Catholic church knowing it meant the end for her common-law marriage to a devout atheist. As a woman with socialistic, anarchistic leanings, Day met Peter Maurin, a man rooted in Catholic traditions, and together they founded the Catholic Worker Catholic Worker. As a journalist, Day wrote about topics ranging from labor disputes to pacifism to motherhood. A social activist, she was last arrested at the age of 75 as a participant in a strike by the United Farm Workers. As part of the Catholic Worker movement, she helped to establish over a hundred Houses of Hospitality. Living in poverty among the poor, Day detested being called a saint.

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