All the World's a Fair: Visions of Empire at American International Expositions, 1876-1916

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University of Chicago Press, Oct 15, 1987 - History - 328 pages
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Robert W. Rydell contends that America's early world's fairs actually served to legitimate racial exploitation at home and the creation of an empire abroad. He looks in particular to the "ethnological" displays of nonwhites—set up by showmen but endorsed by prominent anthropologists—which lent scientific credibility to popular racial attitudes and helped build public support for domestic and foreign policies. Rydell's lively and thought-provoking study draws on archival records, newspaper and magazine articles, guidebooks, popular novels, and oral histories.
 

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Contents

The Chicago Worlds Columbian Exposition of 1893
38
The New Orleans Atlanta and Nashville Expositions
72
The TransMississippi and International Exposition
105
The PanAmerican Exposition Buffalo
126
The Louisiana Purchase Exposition Saint Louis 1904
154
The Expositions in Portland and Seattle
184
The Expositions in San Francisco and San Diego
208
Notes
239
Bibliography
293
Index
317
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About the author (1987)

Robert W. Rydell is professor of history at Montana State University and served as John Adams Professor of American Civilization at the University of Amsterdam.

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