Allen's Astrophysical Quantities

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, 2000 - Science - 719 pages
2 Reviews
This new fourth edition of Allen's classic Astrophysical Quantities belongs on every astronomer's bookshelf. It has been thoroughly revised and brought up to date by a team of more than ninety internationally renowned astronomers and astrophysicists. While it follows the basic format of the original, this indispensable reference has grown to more than twice the size of the earlier editions to accommodate the great strides made in astronomy and astrophysics. It includes detailed tables of the most recent data on: - General constants and units - Atoms, molecules, and spectra - Observational astronomy at all wavelengths from radio to gamma-rays, and neutrinos - Planetary astronomy: Earth, planets and satellites, and solar system small bodies - The Sun, normal stars, and stars with special characteristics - Stellar populations - Cataclysmic and symbiotic variables, supernovae - Theoretical stellar evolution - Circumstellar and interstellar material - Star clusters, galaxies, quasars, and active galactic nuclei - Clusters and groups of galaxies - Cosmology. As well as much explanatory material and extensive and up-to-date bibliographies.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
12 Astronomical Symbols
2
General Constants and Units
7
22 Physical Constants
8
23 General Astronomical Constants
12
24 Astronomical Constants Involving Time
13
25 Units
17
26 Electric and Magnetic Unit Relations
22
Normal Stars
381
152 Spectal Classification
383
153 Photometric Systems
385
154 Stellar Atmospheres
393
155 Stellar Structure
395
Stars with Special Characteristics
397
161 Variable Stars
398
162 Cepheid and CepheidLike Variables
399

Atoms and Molecules
27
32 Elements Atomic Mass and SolarSystem Abundance
28
33 Excitation Ionization and Partition Functions
31
34 Ionization Potentials
35
37 Atomic Radii
43
38 Particles of Modern Physics
44
39 Molecules
45
310 Plasmas
47
Spectra
53
42 Terminology for Atomic States Levels Terms etc
54
43 Electronic Configurations
57
44 Spectrum Line Intensities
60
45 Relative Strengths Within Multiplets
65
46 Wavelets and Wave Numbers
68
47 Atomic Oscillator Strengths for Allowed Lines
69
LowLevel Hyperfine Transitions
78
49 Forbidden Line Transition Probabilities
79
410 Spectra of Diatomic MMolecules
83
411 Energy Levels
85
412 Transitions
87
Dipole Radiation
89
Radiation
95
52 Refractive Index and Average Polarizability
100
53 Absorption and Scattering by Particles
102
54 Photoionization and Recombination
106
55 XRay Attenuation
109
56 Absorption of Material of Stellar Interiors
110
57 Absorption of Material of the Solar Photosphere
114
59 FreeRee Absorption and Emission
115
510 Reflection from Metallic Mirrors
117
Radio Astronomy
121
62 Atmospheric Window and Sky Brightness
123
63 Radio Wave Propagation
125
64 Radio Telescopes and Arrays
128
65 Radio Emission and Absorption Processes
131
66 Radio Astronomy References
140
Infrared Astronomy
143
72 Atmospheric Transmission
144
73 Background Emission
146
74 Detectors and SignaltoNoise Ratios
148
75 Photometry 𝜆 30 𝜇m
149
76 PHOTOMETRY 𝜆 30 𝜇m
154
77 Infrared Line List
155
78 Dust
158
79 Solar System
161
710 Stars
163
711 Extragalactic Objects
164
Ultraviolet Astronomy
169
82 Ultraviolet Astronomy Satellite Missions
170
83 Significant Atlases and Catalogs
172
84 Interstellar Extinction in the Ultraviolet
174
85 Commonly Observed Ultraviolet Emission Lines
175
86 Ultraviolet Spectral Classification
178
87 Ultraviolet Spectrophotometric Standards
180
XRay Astronomy
183
92 Characteristic XRay Transitions
184
94 Transmission of XRays Through the Interstellar Medium
194
95 Cosmic XRay Sources
198
96 Diffuse Background
203
97 XRay Astronomy Missions
205
𝛾Ray and Neutrino Astronomy
207
102 Line Emission Processes
208
103 Scattering and Absorption Processes
213
104 Astrophysical 𝛾Ray Observations
216
105 Neutrinos in Astrophysics
235
106 Current Neutrino Observatories
237
Earth
239
111 Mass and Moments of Inertia
240
113 Gravitational Potential and Relation to Products of Inertia
241
114 Topography
243
115 Rotation Spin and Relation to Products of Inertia
244
116 Gravity
245
118 Coordinates
246
1110 Geological Time Scale
248
1111 Glaciations
251
1112 Plate Tectonics
252
1114 Earth Interior
255
1115 Earth Atmosphere Dry Air at Standard Temperature and Pressure STP
257
1116 Composition of the Atmosphere
258
1117 Water Vapor
259
1119 Regions of Earths Atmosphere and Distribution with Height
260
1120 Atmospheric Refraction and Air Path
262
1121 Atmospheric Scattering and Continuum Absorption
265
1122 Absorption by Atmospheric Gases at Visible and Infrared Wavelengths
268
1123 Thermal Emission by the Atmosphere
270
1124 Ionosphere
271
1125 Night Sky and Aurora
279
1126 Geomagnetism
282
1127 Meteorites and Craters
285
Planets and Satellites
293
122 Orbits and Physical Characteristics of Planets
294
123 Photometry of Planets and Asteroids
298
124 Physical Conditions on Planets
300
125 Names Designations and Discoveries of Satellites
302
126 Satellite Orbits and Physical Elements
303
127 Moon
308
128 Planetary Rings
311
Solar System Small Bodies
315
132 Comets
321
133 Zodiacal Light
328
134 Infrared Zodiacal Emission
331
135 Meteroids and Interplanetary Dust
333
Sun
339
141 Basic Data
340
142 Interior
341
143 Solar Oscillations
342
144 PhotosphericChromospheric Model
348
145 Spectral Lines
351
146 Spectral Distribution
353
147 Limb Darkening
355
148 Corona
357
149 Solar Rotation
362
1410 Granulation
364
1412 Sunspots
367
1413 Sunspot Statistics
370
1414 Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections
373
1415 Solar Radio Emission
375
163 Variable White Dwarf Tables
400
164 LongPeriod Variables
406
166 Rotating Variables
407
167 T Tauri Stars
408
168 Flare Stars
409
169 WolfRayet and Luminous Blue Variable Stars
410
1610 Be Stars
413
1611 Characteristics of CarbonRich Stars
415
1612 Barium CH and Subgiant CH Stars
416
1613 HydrogenDeficient Carbon Stars
417
1614 Blue Stragglers
418
1615 Peculiar A and Magnetic Stars
419
1616 Pulsars
420
1617 Galactic Black Hole Candidate XRay Binaries
422
1618 Double Stars
424
Cataclysmic and Symbiotic Variables
429
172 Types of Symbiotic Variables
447
Supernovae
451
182 Older Population Type Ia Supernovae
452
183 Young Population Supernovae
454
184 SN 1987A
460
185 Characteristics Spectral Lines
463
186 Radio Supernovae
466
188 Supernova Rates
467
189 Old Supernovae Historical Supernovae and Supernova Remnants
468
Star Populations and the Solar Neighborhood
471
192 The Brightest Stars
475
193 Stellar Populations
478
194 Star Counts at High Latitudes
480
195 Vertical Stellar Density Profile
481
196 Main Sequence Field Stellar Luminosity Function
485
198 Luminosity Class Distribution for Nearby Field Stars
486
199 Mass Density in the Solar Neighborhood
487
1910 Stellar Mass Function
488
1911 Solar Motion and Kinematics of Nearby Stars
493
Theoretical Stellar Evolution
499
201 Basic Equations of Stellar Structure
500
202 Stellar Nuclear Energy Generation
502
203 Equations of State
503
204 Stellar Opacities
505
205 Electron Conduction
506
208 Star Formation
507
209 PreMainSequence Evolution
508
2010 MainSequence Population I Stars
509
Massive and IntermediateMass Stars
511
2014 Evolution to Red Giant Branch
514
2016 Red Giant MassLoss Rates
515
2017 Asymptotic Giant Branch Evolution
518
2019 Binary Star Evolution
519
2020 Theory Versus Observation in the HR Diagram
520
Circumstellar and Interstellar Material
523
212 Galactic Interstellar Extinction
527
213 Abundances in Interstellar Gas
529
215 H₂ and Molecular CLouds
532
216 Neutral Gas Clouds Depletions
534
217 H𝚷 Regions Ionized Gas and the Galactic Halo
536
218 Planetary Nebulae PNe
538
219 Supernova Remnants
540
2110 Cosmic Rays Excluding Photons and Neutrinos
541
Star Clusters
545
222 Globular Clusters in the Milky Way
554
223 Globular Clusters in Other Galaxies
562
Milky Way and Galaxies
569
232 Normal Galaxy
576
Quasars and Active Galactic Nuclei
585
242 The Types of Active Galactic Nuclei
586
243 Catalogs and Surveys
591
244 Commonly Measured Parameters
593
245 Emission Lines
595
246 Absorption Lines
601
247 Spectral Energy DistributionSEDs
602
248 Luminosity Functions and the Space Distribution of Quasars
605
249 BL Lacs HPQs and OVVs
607
2410 LowLuminosity Active Galactic Nuclei LLAGN
608
Clusters and Groups of Galaxies
613
251 Typical Properties of Clusters and Groups of Galaxies
614
252 Cluster Catalogs
615
253 Catalog of Nearby Rich Clusters of Galaxies
617
254 Cluster Properties
620
255 Cluster Classification
625
256 cD Galaxies
627
258 Mass Function of Clusters
628
259 XRay Emission from Cluster
630
2510 The SunyaevZeldovich Effect in Clusters
632
2511 Clusters as Gravitational Lenses
633
2512 Groups of Galaxies
637
2513 QuasarCluster Association
639
2514 Clusters as Gravitational Lenses
640
Cosmology
643
261 FriedmannRobertsonWalker Metric and Distance Measures
644
262 The Age of the Universe
646
263 Conversation Factors for the Early Universe
647
264 Other Useful Conversion Factors
648
265 Cosmological Parameters
649
266 FriedmannLemaitre Model
650
268 Age Limits
652
H₀
653
2611 Other Cosmological Parameters
654
2613 Power Spectrum of Density Fluctuation
655
2614 Structure Formation Scales
656
2615 Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies
658
2616 LargeScale Structure
659
2617 Densities
660
2618 Velocities
661
2619 Intergalactic Medium
662
2620 Extragalactic Diffuse Backgrounds
663
Incidental Tables
667
272 Standard Epochs
668
273 Reduction for Precession
669
274 Solar Coordinates and Related Quantities
670
275 Constellations
672
276 The Messier Objects
674
277 Astrometry
677
278 Optical and Infrared Interferometry
687
279 The Worlds Largest Optical Telescopes
689
Index
701
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