Alone: The Classic Polar Adventure

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Kodansha International, 1995 - Biography & Autobiography - 309 pages
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NATIONAL BOOK AWARD NOMINEE
Long regarded as the most magical of the European dynasties, the Rothschild family today remains one of the most powerful and wealthy in the world. No family in the past two centuries has been so constantly at the center of Europe's great events, has featured such varied and spectacular personalities, has had anything close to the wealth of the Rothschilds. In Frederic Morton's classic tale, the family is brought vividly to life. Here you'll meet characters as lively as you can imagine: Mayer, long-time advisor to Germany's princes, who broke through the barriers of a Frankfurt ghetto and placed his family on the road to wealth and power; Lord Alfred, who maintained a private train, private orchestra (which he conducted), and private circus (of which he was ringmaster); Baron Philippe, whose rarefied vintages bear labels created by great artists, among them Picasso, Dali, and Haring; and Kathleen Nica Rothschild de Koenigswarter, the "jazz baroness," in whose arms Charlie Parker died. The family itself has been at the center of some of the most crucial moments in history: the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo, the development of the Suez Canal, the introduction of Jews in the House of Lords. Through it all, the Rothschild name has continued to represent the family ideal: a shrewd business and financial sense, activity in the Jewish community and the arts, and an always luxurious-and often eccentric-lifestyle.
Nominated for a National Book Award when it was first published in 1962, Frederic Morton's The Rothschllds is here reissued with a new afterword by the author, bringing the tale of this extraordinary family to the present.

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Alone: The Classic Polar Adventure (Kodansha Globe.)

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In this 1938 volume, the great explorer recounts four months he spent alone gathering scientific data in a shack in Antarctica. The result is a remarkable story of survival and adventure. This facsimile edition is published in a blue typeface. Read full review

Contents

THE IDEA
3
THE DECISION
29
APRIL I THE GOD OF 2 5 60
79
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd was a U.S. naval officer and aviator-the only person of his time who had flown over both the North Pole and the South Pole and one of the first men to fly the Atlantic. During World War I, he was lieutenant commander of the U.S. air forces in Canada. Skyward (1928) tells of the first airplane flight made over the North Pole with Floyd Bennett in 1926. Little America (1930) is a detailed record of Byrd's flight over the South Pole. Alone (1938) is his remarkable tale of fortitude during his self-imposed isolation at Advance Base in the Antarctic in 1934. In the spring of 1947, Byrd returned from his fifth and largest polar expedition, the largest exploring expedition ever organized-13 ships staffed by 4,000 men, entirely naval in personnel. Byrd received a special medal of the National Geographic Society from President Herbert Hoover in 1930, the Legion of Merit for outstanding services from President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1945, and the Defense Department's Medal of Freedom in 1957. President Dwight Eisenhower placed Byrd in charge of all Antarctic activities of the United States. Admiral Byrd was in over-all command of the Naval task force that, between 1955 and 1959, was to prepare, supply and maintain a series of scientific stations in Antarctica. Byrd died in 1957. He was buried with full military honors in the Arlington National Cemetery.

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