Alone in the Mirror: Twins in Therapy

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Routledge, 2012 - Psychology - 190 pages
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Alone in the Mirror: Twins in Therapy chronicles the triumphs and struggles of twins as they separate from one another and find their individuality in a world of non twins. The text is grounded in issues of attachment and intimacy, and is highlighted by Dr. Barbara Klein’s scholarly research, clinical experiences with twins in therapy, and her own identity struggles as a twin, all of which allow her to present insights into the rare, complicated, and misunderstood twin identity. She presents psychologically-focused real life histories, which demonstrate how childhood experiences shape the twin attachment and individual development, and she describes implications for twins in therapy, their therapists, and parents of twins. Unique to this book are effective therapeutic practices, developed specifically for twins, and designed to raise the consciousness of parents as well. Readers will find these practices and the insights within invaluable, whether they use them to communicate with twin patients, family members, or if they are part of a twinship themselves.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 The Real Facts About Twins
1
Implications for Psychotherapy and Parenting
19
Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in Twins
45
The Resolution of Major Depressive Disorders
69
Chapter 5 Real Differences Between Twins and Identity Development
91
Chapter 6 Looking at and Reactingto the Twin Attachment
113
Chapter 7 What Is Lost When a Twin Dies?
125
Implications for Psychotherapy
151
Chapter 9 Alone in the Mirror
171
Bibliography
173
Index
181
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About the author (2012)

Barbara Klein, PhD, ED, has her doctorate in child development and clinical psychology. She is an expert on identity development in twins. Alone in the Mirror: Twins in Therapy is her third book on psychological issues that are particular to twins. Her own experiences growing up as an identical twin are coupled with her clinical experiences and phenomenological research on twins.

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