Along Alaska's Great River: A Popular Account of the Travels of Alaska Exploring Expedition Along the Great Yukon River, from Its Source to Its Mouth, in the British North-west Territory, and in the Territory of Alaska

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G.M. Hill Company, 1900 - Discoveries in geography - 426 pages
 

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Page 413 - ... north latitude, and between the 131st and 133d degree of west longitude (meridian of Greenwich,) the said line shall ascend to the north along the channel called Portland channel, as far as the point of the continent where it strikes the 56th degree of north latitude; from this last mentioned point, the line of demarcation shall follow the summit of the mountains situated parallel to the coast as far as the point of intersection of the 1416t degree of west longitude, (of the same meridian;) and...
Page 413 - Island, which point lies in the parallel of 54 degrees 40 minutes north latitude, and between the 131st and the 133d degree of west longitude, (meridian of Greenwich.) the said line shall ascend to the north along the channel called Portland channel, as far as the point of the continent where it strikes the 56th degree of north latitude...
Page 414 - ... degree of west longitude shall prove to be at the distance of more than ten marine leagues from the ocean, the limit between the British possessions and the line of coast which is to belong to Russia, as above mentioned...
Page 413 - ... point, the line of demarcation shall follow the summit of the mountains situated parallel to the coast as far as the point of intersection of the 141st degree of west longitude (of the same meridian); and, finally, from the said point of intersection, the said meridian line of the 141st degree, in its prolongation as far as the Frozen Ocean, shall form the limit between the Russian and British possessions on the continent of America to the north-west.
Page 31 - ... bottom, though there must have been fully thirty or forty feet of water where we made our observations. On one of the large islands in Sitka harbor, called Japanese Island, an old Niphon junk was cast, early in the present century, and her small crew of Japanese were rescued by the Russians. Sitka has been so often described that it is unnecessary to do more than refer the reader to other accounts of the place.
Page 11 - The people of the United States will not be quick to take to the idea that the volume of water in an Alaskan river is greater than that discharged by the mighty Mississippi ; but it is entirely within the bounds of honest statement to say that the Yukon river . . . discharges every hour one-third more water than the
Page 416 - Russian-American treaties of 1824 and 1825 respectively, following the summits of a chain of mourn tains supposed to run parallel with the coast at a distance not greater than three marine leagues from the sea between the head of Portland Canal and Mount St. Elias. The Arctic division is situated almost entirely above the Arctic circle and is known to explorers only from observations made along the seacoast. The interior consists doubtless of frozen plains and low ranges of hills, intersected by...
Page 401 - Here is an immense tract reaching from Bering strait in a succession of rolling ice-bound moors and low mountain ranges, for seven hundred miles an unbroken waste, to the boundary line between us and British America. Then, again, from the crests of Cook's Inlet and the flanks of Mount St Elias northward over that vast area of rugged mountain and lonely moor to the east, nearly eight hundred miles, is a great expanse of country ... by its position barred out from occupation and settlement by our own...
Page 402 - Kuskokvim and chose of the coast between Bristol Bay and Norton Sound. But the trader as he travels sees nothing, remembers nothing, but his trade, and rarely is he capable of giving any definite information beyond the single item of his losses or his gains through the regions he may traverse. We know, however, enough to say now, without much hesitation, that this great extent which we call the interior is by its position barred out from occupation and settlement by our own people, and the climatic...
Page 412 - ... garments. The skins, yet warm from the body, are discharged into capacious salt houses and salted down for the time being like fish in bins. This treatment is continued for some time and after the application of heavy pressure they are finally tied into bundles of two each, securely strapped, and then shipped.

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