And the Witnesses Were Silent: The Confessing Church and the Persecution of the Jews

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U of Nebraska Press, 2000 - History - 304 pages
An endlessly perplexing question of the twentieth century is how ?decent? people came to allow, and sometimes even participate in, the Final Solution. Fear obviously had its place, as did apathy. But how does one explain the silence of those people who were committed, active, and often fearless opponents of the Nazi regime on other grounds?those who spoke out against Nazi activities in many areas yet whose response to genocide ranged from tepid disquiet to avoidance? One such group was the Confessing Church, Protestants who often risked their own safety to aid Christian victims of Nazi oppression but whose response to pogroms against Jews was ambivalent.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Church Responses to Early AntiJewish Measures
12
Early Church Statements
20
Gutachten and Synodal Resolutions
30
The Pastors Emergency League
45
The Aryan Paragraph and the Protestant Press
64
The Isolation of the Jews 193538
87
A Divided Confessing Church
93
Reactions to the November Pogrom
143
Relief Work
155
The Godesberg Declaration
176
The Aryan Certificate for Theologians
186
The Final Solution and the End of the Church Struggle
192
Confessions of Guilt
223
The Confessing Churchs Record under Nazism
230
Notes
237

The Jewish Question after Steglitz
100
The Evangelical Church and Its NonAryan Members
114
Ecumenical Responses
130
Glossary
287
Index
295
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Wolfgang Gerlach is a retired pastor in the Evangelical Church of Germany. Victoria J. Barnett is a consultant for the Department of Church Relations at theĝU.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and the editor of Bystanders: Conscience and Complicity during the Holocaust.

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