Alternative Education: Global Perspectives Relevant to the Asia-Pacific Region

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Mar 30, 2007 - Education - 220 pages
0 Reviews

Alternative streams of education have been and remain an important but difficult theme for teachers, parents, policy-makers, and scholars. By focusing on case studies of six countries (Bolivia, Thailand, Australia, USA, The Netherlands, and Denmark), and by comprehensively analysing these by means of international comparative methodologies, the author approaches the nuts and bolts issues of alternative and mainstream education systems. The case studies include Charter Schools in the USA and Waldorf Schools in Australia. The study presents not only an insightful analysis of alternative forms of education with regard to actual issues in societies and also legal and administrative features of education. It provides insights into the kind of school development that could be appropriate in the 21st century and the types of educational communities we should seek to create in the age of globalisation.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Alternative Education An Overview
1
Genealogies of Alternative Education
2
Passive and Active Approaches
3
Reapprehending Alternative Education in the Presentday Context
4
Looking Beyond the Narrow Constraints of Historical Era and Region of Origin
6
Alternative Education as a Minority Movement
7
SelfReflective Reapprehension of Education
8
Case Study Bolivia
11
Case Study Denmark
95
Introduction
96
Constitutionally Guaranteed Parental Rights and the Increase in Independent Schools
97
Relative Autonomy from the State System and Market System
99
Pluralistic Networks that Foster Diversity in Alternative Education
100
Parental Participation and Freedom in School Creation
102
A System that Enhances Freedom
104
Evaluation of the Education and Supervision of the Administration at Independent Schools
106

Introduction
12
Vicissitudes Leading to Flight of the President
13
La Floresta School as an Alternative
15
From La Floresta School to Ajayu School
22
Case Study Thailand
25
Introduction
26
The Philosophy and Practice of the Childrens Village School
28
Recent Educational Policy and Alternative Education
29
The National Education Act and the Childrens Village School
30
Pluralistic Educational Philosophy and the National Education Act
32
Diverse Alternative Education and a Centralized System
34
Case Study Australia
35
Realizing the Principles of Waldorf Education Under an Existing System
37
Courses of Instruction with Established Reputations
38
Linking up with Institutions of Higher Education
39
A Code of Ethics that Restrains a Runaway Market
42
Mutual Assistance Network
43
Issues for the Future
45
A FamilyScale Independent School Engaged in a Hard Struggle
46
Natural Learning and Natural Learners
48
Full School Meetings and the Justice Committee
49
School Budgets
50
Struggles with the State Government
52
Relationship with the Association of Independent Schools
54
Identifying the Mechanisms that Foster Relatedness
55
Case Study The Netherlands
57
Freedom of Education and the Principal of Financial Equality
58
Historical Background
59
Freedom of Education as a Positive Freedom
60
The Authority of Educational Administration
61
Growing Prominence of the Alternative Stream in Education
63
Diversity of Support Organizations
67
Quality Control Mechanisms
68
Toward a New Struggle
71
Case Study The State of Oregon in the United States of America
75
Introduction
76
The Center for Appropriate Transport
78
Diverse Educational Opportunities
80
Changes in the Definition of Alternative Education
83
Three Streams of Alternative Education
85
A SelfHelp Organization for Alternative Schools and Networks
88
Mechanisms Function by School District
89
The Desired Modality of Pluralistic Quality Assurance
90
Issues for the Future
91
School Boards and Principals
108
The Relationship Between the Ministry of Education and the Independent Schools
109
A Flexible Organized Movement
110
Recent Changes in Society
111
The Significance of Being a Minority
112
How Much Alternative Education Is There?
115
A Quantitative Grasp of Alternative Education in Countries Where Alternative Schools Are Positioned as Institutions
116
New Zealand
118
Denmark
120
Oregon State
122
Quality Assurance in Alternative Education Current Circumstances and Issues
127
Cases of Disputes Involving Alternative Schools
128
The Alternative School as an Achilles Heel
129
The Difficulty of Evaluating What is Unique
131
NeoLiberalistic Education Reform and Alternative Schools
132
Struggles of the Socially Disadvantaged
133
Quality Assurance in Alternative Schools
134
Assurance and Regulation Provided by Legal Statutes
135
Equivalence with Public Education
138
National Guidelines and Goals
139
Regulations Concerning Welfare and Human Rights
140
Accreditation and Inspection
141
Curriculum
144
Approved Designated Textbooks
145
Teacher Licensing
146
Regulations Regarding Assets and Property
147
Assuring Necessary Minimum Numbers of Students
148
Pros and Cons of Quality Assurance
149
National Guidelines as Standards for Accreditation
151
Standards for Accreditation and Evaluation
154
The State of Alternative Education in Different Countries
157
International Comparison of Quality Assurance
158
Public Subsidies in the Various Countries
160
Government Administration of Education in Terms of Quality Assurance and Public Subsidies in the Different Countries
161
Comparative Examination of Government Administration of Alternative Education
168
Pitfalls of Alternative Education
174
Enclosure by National Governments
175
SelfConfinement in a Private Sphere
177
Quality Assurance Suitable for Formation of a Public Sphere
178
References
183
Postlude
205
Author Index
209
Subject Index
211
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases