Alternative Exchanges: Second-Hand Circulations from the Sixteenth Century to the Present

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Laurence Fontaine
Berghahn Books, Apr 30, 2008 - History - 280 pages
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Exchanges have always had more than economic significance: values circulate and encounters become institutionalized. This volume explores the changing meaning of the circulation of second-hand goods from the Renaissance to today, and thereby examines the blurring of boundaries between market, gifts, and charity. It describes the actors of the market - official entities such as corporations, recognized professions, and established markets but also the subterranean circulation that develops around the need for money. The complex layers that not only provide for numerous intermediaries but also include the many men and women who, as sellers or buyers, use these circulations on countless occasions are also examined.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter 1Secondhand dealers in the early modern low countries
13
Chapter 2Using things as money
43
Chapter 3Prostitution and the circulation of secondhand goods in early modern Rome
61
Chapter 4The Magazine of all their pillaging
76
Chapter 5The exchange of secondhand goods between survival strategies and business in eighteenthcentury Paris
97
Chapter 6Uses of the used
115
Chapter 7The scope and structure of the nineteenthcentury secondhand trade in the Parisian clothes market
127
Chapter 9Moving on
165
Chapter 10The secondhand car market as a form of resistance
186
Chapter 11Utopia postponed?
208
Chapter 12Charity commerce consumption
221
Conclusion
235
Bibliography
244
Notes on Contributors
263
Index
265

Chapter 8What goes Round comes Round
152

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About the author (2008)

Laurence Fontaine studied History and Sociology at Paris-Sorbonne University and was appointed by the C.N.R.S. in 1989. She was Professor in the History Department of the European University Institute, Florence, Italy from 1995 until 2003 and is currently Directrice de Recherche in the C.N.R.S., attached to the EHESS in Paris.

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