Amazonian Linguistics: Studies in Lowland South American Languages

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Doris L. Payne
University of Texas Press, Jun 23, 2014 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 584 pages
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Lowland South American languages have been among the least studied ln the world. Consequently, their previous contribution to linguistic theory and language universals has been small. However, as this volume demonstrates, tremendous diversity and significance are found in the languages of this region.

These nineteen essays, originally presented at a conference on Amazonian languages held at the University of Oregon, offer new information on the Tupian, Cariban, Jivaroan, Nambiquaran, Arawakan, Tucanoan, and Makuan languages and new analyses of previously recalcitrant Tupí-Guaraní verb agreement systems.

The studies are descriptive, but typological and theoretical implications are consistently considered. Authors invariably indicate where previous claims must be adjusted based on the new information presented. This is true in the areas of nonlinear phonological theory, verb agreement systems and ergativity, grammatical relations and incorporation, and the uniqueness of Amazonian noun classification systems. The studies also contribute to the now extensive interest in grammatical change.

 

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Contents

I
1
II
11
III
13
IV
75
V
89
VI
117
VII
159
VIII
161
XIV
293
XV
321
XVI
365
XVII
367
XVIII
393
XIX
407
XX
429
XXI
455

IX
185
X
211
XI
213
XII
243
XIII
273
XXII
457
XXIII
495
XXIV
543
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