Ambiguity in the Western Mind

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Craig J. N. De Paulo, Patrick A. Messina, Marc Stier
Peter Lang, 2005 - Literary Collections - 248 pages
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Ambiguity in the Western Mind includes a collection of essays by internationally renowned scholars such as John D. Caputo, Camille Paglia, Jaroslav Pelikan, and Roland Teske along with a preface by Joseph Margolis, all taking up the question of the significance of ambiguity in Western thought. This engaging topic will be of interest to scholars and students alike from across the disciplines. Tracing the conceptual relevance of ambiguity historically and through some of the great books that have formed Western consciousness, this volume is a major contribution to the contemporary discussion surrounding this controversial notion, especially as a hermeneutical concept for interpreting the classics.
 

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Contents

St Augustines Phenomenology of Confusion
5
Caputo
15
Tragic Ambiguity in the Oedipus Tyrannos
35
Is Socrates a Model? Ambiguity in the Symposium of Plato
51
Augustine of Hippo on Seeing with the Eyes of the Mind
72
Craig J N de Paulo
88
Certitude in Ambiguity
101
Ambiguity in Hamlet
117
Leo Tolstoy Russias Greatest Heretic
131
Erste Fassung
148
Huck Finn as Moral Quagmire
171
An Afterthought on Ambiguity
213
Index
245
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About the author (2005)

The Editors: Craig J. N. de Paulo is Visiting Assistant Professor in the Intellectual Heritage Program at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He received his Ph.D. and Ph.L. in philosophy from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome.
Patrick Messina is Lecturer in the Intellectual Heritage Program at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He received his Ph.L. in philosophy from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome.
Marc Stier is Associate Director and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Intellectual Heritage Program at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He received his Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University.

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