Ambiguous Gender in Early Modern Spain and Portugal: Inquisitors, Doctors and the Transgression of Gender Norms

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BRILL, Aug 27, 2012 - History - 328 pages
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From the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries, the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisitions conducted a number of trials against individuals accused by members of their communities of being of the other gender men accused of being women and women accused of being men or even hermaphrodites. Using new inquisitorial sources, this study examines the complexities revolving around transgenderism and the construction of gender identity in the early modern Iberian World. It throws light upon the manner in which the Inquisition, medical practitioners and the wider society in Spain and Portugal responded to transgenderism and on the self-perception of individuals whose behaviour, whether consciously or unconsciously, flouted these social and sexual conventions.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Gender Stereotypes and Sexual Transgressions in Early Modern Spain and Portugal
17
2 Inquisitors and Hermaphrodites
50
The Trial of Francisco Roca 16491650
96
The Trial of Father Pedro Furtado 16981701
125
The Trial of Joseph Josepha Martins 1725
181
The Trial of Maria Duran 17411744
210
Conclusion
286
Appendix
305
Bibliography
315
Index
325
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About the author (2012)

Fran ois Soyer, Ph.D. (2007), University of Cambridge, is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. He is currently a lecturer in early modern history at Southampton (UK) and an Australian Research Council research fellow at the University of Adelaide (Australia).

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