Amelia Bedelia

Front Cover
HarperTrophy, 1992 - Juvenile Fiction - 63 pages
7 Reviews
In 1957, Harper published its first I Can Read title, Little Bear, written by Else Holmelund Minarik and illustrated by Maurice Sendak. Large type, simple vocabulary, chapter-like divisions, and decorative pictures made Little Bear perfect for emerging readers

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User Review  - DearReader, - Borders

I loved this book when I was a kid, but thought twice about giving it as a gift because if the reader doesn't understand why Amelia would be asked to dress a turkey, and why it's funny that the turkey ... Read full review

Review: Amelia Bedelia (I Can Read Book-Level 2)

User Review  - Felicity The Magnificent - Goodreads

Amelia Bedelia was not doing right choices. She was being silly with her work they wrote on the list. And before she did any of the things they wrote on the list, she made lemon meringue pie. Amelia ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
6
Section 2
11
Section 3
18
Copyright

1 other sections not shown

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About the author (1992)

Peggy Parish was born in Manning, South Carolina on July 14, 1927. She attended the University of South Carolina and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English. While visiting her brother in Kentucky, Parish was persuaded to enter the teaching profession. After teaching creative dancing to young children, she moved to Oklahoma and taught third grade in the Panhandle, in addition to teaching dance and producing community shows. Parish's first book, My Golden Book of Manners, was published in 1961, followed by Let's Be Indians in 1962. A parent of one of the students, who was an editor of adult books, found out she was trying to break into the writing field and introduced her to an editor at Harper who helped improve her skills as a storyteller. This, of course, led to her biggest breakthrough, the creation of Amelia Bedelia in 1963. Parish eventually wrote 11 more Amelia Bedelia books as well as a number of mystery novels, and arts and crafts books. Among these other titles are Haunted House, Dinosaur Time, The Chimp That Went to School and Let's Celebrate: Holiday Decorations You Can Make. In addition to writing books, Parish did television pieces on preschool education and children's books, wrote book review columns and led a number of in-service training workshops for teachers. Parish died of an aneurysm on November 19, 1988. Her nephew, Herman Parish, continues to recreate new titles in the Amelia Bedelia series.

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