American Enterprise in Japan

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SUNY Press, Aug 6, 1991 - Business & Economics - 294 pages
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This book describes how American and Japanese management ideologies meet, collide, and contend in the process of competitive cooperation during a joint venture in Japan. In a detailed case study, Hamada describes the very real problems when Japanese and American managers run a business operation, and analyzes them from a comparative, relativistic, and historical perspective. The author presents a novel and effective way of viewing organizational dynamics, seeing the ‘unfinished’ cultural process between different sub-groups who create and recreate the symbolic meanings of corporate phenomena. Her succinct analysis of Japanese and American behavioral modes makes both practical and theoretical contributions to the field of international management.

Highlighting the interdependence between corporate culture and broader societal culture, Hamada looks closely at interactions between American and Japanese businessmen, analyzes their cultural differences, and proposes that these differences can be viewed not just as a source of continuing conflict but of dynamic cooperation.
 

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Contents

Cultural Encounters
1
Working in Japan
12
Foreign Enterprises and Japanese Corporate Environment
31
Nippon Kaisha
61
The Jointventure Company Nippon United
115
Organizational Culture
199
The Historical Context
221
Notes
251
Bibliography
259
Major Players in the Joint Venture Nippon United
283
Index
287
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

Tomoko Hamada is Chair of the East Asian Studies Program and Associate Professor of Anthropology at the College of William and Mary.

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