America, Americanism, Americanization

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1919 - Aliens - 22 pages
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Page 13 - What should be said of a democracy which is challenged by the world to prove the superiority of its system of government over those discarded, and yet is compelled to reach many millions of its people through papers printed in some foreign language?
Page 22 - English language, and of other resident persons of foreign birth ; will provide for cooperation with the States in the education of such persons in the English language, the fundamental principles of government and citizenship, the elements of knowledge pertaining to self-support and home making, and in such other work as will assist in preparing such illiterates and foreign-born persons for successful living and intelligent American citizenship...
Page 13 - What should be said of a democracy which calls upon its citizens to consider the wisdom of forming a league of nations, of passing judgment upon a code which will insure the freedom of the seas, or of sacrificing the daily stint of wheat or meat for the benefit of the Roumanians or the Jugo-Slavs when 18 per cent of the coming citizens of that democracy do not go to school? What should be said of a democracy in which one of its sovereign States expends a grand total of $6 per year per child for sustaining...
Page 10 - United States — to liberate them from the blinders of ignorance, that all the wealth and beauties of literature and the knowledge that comes through the printed word can be revealed to them. Congress will be asked to help all States willing to cooperate in banishing illiteracy. And I want you to help. We want to interpret America in terms of fair play, in terms of the square deal. We want to interpret America in healthier babies that have enough milk to drink. We want to interpret America in boys...
Page 8 - What does that rock say to you?" I would take him down on the James River, to its ruined church, and I would ask," What does that little church say to you?" And I would take him to Valley Forge and point out the huts in which Washington's men lived, 3,000 of them, struggling for the independence of our country. And I would ask, "What does this example spell to you? What caused them, what induced those colonists to suffer as they did — willingly...
Page 6 - American out of a man who is not inspired by our ideals, and there is no way by which we can make anyone feel that it is a blessed and splendid thing to be an American, unless we are ourselves aglow with the sacred fire, unless we interpret Americanism by our kindness, our courage, our generosity, our fairness.
Page 10 - ... through the printed word can be revealed to them. Congress will be asked to help all States willing to cooperate in banishing illiteracy. And I want you to help. We want to interpret America in terms of fair play, in terms of the square deal. We want to interpret America in healthier babies that have enough milk to drink. We want to interpret America in boys and girls and men and women that can read and write. We want to interpret America in better housing conditions and decent wages, in hours...
Page 9 - Let us never forget that we are what we are because we have accomplished. There is a sentimentality which would make it appear that in some millennial day man will not work. If some such calamity ever blights us, then man will fail and fall back. God is great. His first and His greatest gift to man was the obligation cast upon him to labor. The march of civilization is the epic of man as a workingman, and that is the reason why labor must be held high always.
Page 8 - States — 250,000 miles of railroad, 240,000 schools, colleges, water powers, mines, furnaces, factories, the industrial life of America, the sports of America, the baseball game in all its glory. And I would give to that man a knowledge of America that, would make him ask the question,
Page 7 - I would have that man see America from the reindeer ranges of Alaska to the Everglades of Florida. I would make him realize that we have within our soil every raw product essential to the conduct of any industry. I would take him 3,000 miles from New York, where stands one of the greatest universities in the world, to another great university, where, 70 years ago, there was nothing but a deer pasture.

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