America in So Many Words: Words That Have Shaped America

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Sep 13, 1999 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 320 pages
0 Reviews
This book presents a unique historical view of American English. It chronicles year by year the contributions Americans have made to the vocabulary of English and the words Americans have embraced through the evolution of the nation. For important years from the settlement of Jamestown until 1750, and for every year from 1750 through 1998, a prominent word is analyzed and discussed in its historical context. The result is a fascinating survey of American linguistic culture through past centuries. The authors -- both lifelong students of American English -- bring great depth of understanding to these key words that have made America, and American English, what they are today.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

America in so many words: words that have shaped America

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

From skunk and canoe in the 16th century to virtual reality and soccer mom in the late 20th century, this year-by-year review highlights words that have had an indelible American origin or meaning ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

14971750
1
17511800
60
18011865
102
18661900
163
19011900
198
19451944
241
Indexes
293
Word Index
295
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1999)

Allan Metcalf is a professor of English at MacMurray College, executive secretary of the American Dialect Society, and author of books on language and writing. His books on language include AMERICA IN SO MANY WORDS (with David K. Barnhart), THE WORLD IN SO MANY WORDS, HOW WE TALK: AMERICAN REGIONAL ENGLISH TODAY, PREDICTING NEW WORDS, and PRESIDENTIAL VOICES. His books on writing include RESEARCH TO THE POINT and ESSENTIALS OF WRITING TO THE POINT. He lives in Jacksonville, Illinois.

Bibliographic information