America in Spitsbergen: The Romance of an Arctic Coal-mine, with an Introduction Relating the History and Describing the Land and the Flora and Fauna of Spitsbergen, Volume 2

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Page 130 - The right of citizens of the United States to acquire property in foreign ships has been held to be a natural right, independent of statutory law, and such property is as much entitled to protection by the United States as any other property of a citizen of the United States.
Page 260 - American and Norwegian subjects to land in that Archipelago are still in progress." (President Taft, "Message on Foreign Relations," Congressional Record, 62nd Congress, Second Session, Vol. 48, l9ll, l December l9ll, p. 74.) 30 "Observations on the Draft of a Convention concerning Spitzbergen, agreed upon by plenipotentiaries of Norway, Russia, and Sweden, and proposed to their respective governments, submitted on behalf of the Arctic Coal Company and Frederick Ayer and John M. Longyear," filed...
Page 223 - ... in the month of September, 1862, be and is hereby referred to the Court of Claims for its decision in accordance with law, and to award such damages as may be just in the premises, if he may be found to be entitled to any damages." Before this resolution was passed, the matter of the claim had been the subject of diplomatic correspondence between the governments of the United States and Prussia. The following article, originally adopted in the treaty of peace between the United States and Prussia,...
Page 349 - a Corporation organized under the laws of West Virginia, having its principal offices and place of business in Boston, Massachusetts, and Ayer and Longyear, a partnership, of Boston...
Page 278 - ... is no export duty levied on rubber shipped from this isthmus. The eventual failure of the rubber supply on this Isthmus is a matter of serious concern to those who deal in this valuable article. The terribly destructive method practiced here of cutting down the tree is, in another form, a repetition of the old story of killing the goose that laid the golden eggs. Every year the rubber gatherers have to penetrate further and further into the dense forests to find the caucho tree, and without advance...
Page 350 - LONGYEAR agree to operate said mines to their fullest capacity during the period of this lease, and to render to ARCTIC COAL COMPANY a monthly report of coal production and the cost thereof, of all contracts for the sale of such coal and delivery of same, and to render at the termination of this lease a full and complete accounting arising out of the tenure, operation, and sales by said AYER...
Page 390 - Lerner's rival appeared. This was an expedition sent by the Deutsche Seefischerei-Verein to continue the investigations begun the previous year. It had left Hamburg before Lerner, but had dallied on the way. Two trawlers accompanied the expedition. Lerner was expecting it, and thwarted all its attempts to acquire land or make use of its huts. Eventually a...
Page 188 - ... planets. These may be put on a frame of little sticks and turned round. This causes the tides. Those at the ends of the sticks are enormously far away. From time to time a diligent searching of the sticks reveals new planets. The orbit of a planet is the distance the stick goes round in going round. Astronomy is intensely interesting; it should be done at night, in a high tower in Spitzbergen. This is to avoid the astronomy being interrupted.
Page 390 - The same Summer another German expedition, sent by the Deutsche Seefischerei-Verein to investigate fisheries, set up a few small huts on the ground claimed by Lerner, who was not consulted in the matter. Next Summer was more eventful. Lerner, traveling in a fast steamer, was landed on Bear Island before the end of May.
Page 391 - He received them with an armed guard at the landingplace, and after reading a long address on his rights to the island, gave them permission to continue their work. Norwegian whalers, who for several years had maintained a station at South Haven, were received in a similar way, but they treated this buccaneer in a more cavalier fashion.

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