America's Unwritten Constitution: Science, Religion, and Political Responsibility

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Harvard University Press, 1985 - Political Science - 202 pages
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Don K. Price seeks the cause of the nation‚e(tm)s inability to develop coherent policies and manage consistent programs and finds it in American attitudes toward authority. This country‚e(tm)s managerial disarray can be traced to religious and philosophical roots of our informal system of government and its development. Price shows how a native American skepticism toward all establishments, combined with a belief in the role of science as advancing progress, has given us a moralistic, reformist view of government that rejects compromise even for the sake of coherence and continuity. This is unlike the experience of Great Britain and Canada, which he relates in a series of incisive comparisons.
 

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Contents

Introduction The Confused Sources of Authority
1
Saints and Scientists
15
The Dissenting Establishment
34
Social Perfectibility and Human Engineering
60
The Seamy Side of Sovereignty
73
The Institutional Presidency and the Cabinet
99
Accountability Under the Unwritten
129
References and Reminiscences
153
Index
195
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About the author (1985)

Don K. Price was Dean of the John Fitzgerald Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and the 1967 President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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