America's Conquest of Europe

Front Cover
American Unitarian Association, 1913 - Europe - 70 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 51 - And it is by the combined efforts of the weak, made under compulsion, to resist the reign of force and constant wrong, that, in the rapid change but slow progress of four hundred years, liberty has been preserved, and secured, and extended, and finally understood.
Page 3 - ... American. It should take place on America soil. It is a necessary condition of progress that the best men of the new world should come in closer touch with the best men of the Old World. Emigration, perhaps more than war, has deprived the old, historic countries of their most energetic and fittest sons, to build the progressive and wealthy people you are on this side of the Atlantic. You are, for us Europeans, the beloved brotherland. Do not forget that Europe is always and will still remain...
Page 25 - power" hampered as is the state of Illinois would chafe against its limitations, and its militarists would talk of fighting their way to the ocean. But viewed as a jurisdiction, surrounded by similar jurisdictions, the people of Illinois have no consciousness of limitation. And this should be our ultimate conception of a nation. Its boundary line should represent merely the limit of jurisdiction.
Page 3 - ... countries of their most energetic and fittest sons, to build the progressive and wealthy people you are on this side of the Atlantic. You are, for us Europeans, the beloved brotherland. Do not forget that Europe is always and will still remain for you the beloved Motherland. Europe is now for the New World what Greece was for Europe. Europe has liberated Greece ; America has to liberate Europe from its burdens, its prejudices, its hatreds. It is your duty, it is your highest duty to reconcile...
Page 46 - ... the financial and great industrial magnates, who seem destined more and more to control national politics, may in the future render such wars impossible. Militarism may long survive, for that, as has been shown, is serviceable in many ways to the maintenance of a plutocracy. Its expenditure furnishes a profitable support to certain strong vested interests, it is a decorative element in social life, and above all it is necessary to keep down the pressure of the forces of internal reform.
Page 3 - America has to liberate Europe from its burdens, its prejudices, its hatreds. It is your duty, it is your highest duty, to reconcile outside your borders the people you have reconciled within your borders. For indeed the American people .... is the elect people which can alone transform all of the peoples of the earth into a family of nations — a brotherhood of men.
Page 3 - ... consultative body of mankind. The first session was, unfortunately, quite European. Its second session ought to be mainly American. It should take place on America soil. It is a necessary condition of progress that the best men of the new world should come in closer touch with the best men of the Old World. Emigration, perhaps more than war, has deprived the old, historic countries of their most energetic and fittest sons, to build the progressive and wealthy people you are on this side of the...
Page 3 - ... international congresses and international associations are all peace congresses and peace societies. Now, you can understand the greatness and the importance of the world's congresses of international associations. Now you are aware of the necessity to organize its second session on American soil. For indeed the American people is at present the true international people; it is the elected people which alone can further internationalism and transform all of the peoples of the earth into a family...
Page 58 - OUT relations with other nations? Why did the New England Federalists oppose the War of 1812? Why has the Treaty of Ghent become so famous? The Rush-Bagot Agreement of 1817 provided that there should be no warships on the Great Lakes which join the United States and Canada, and ever since that time, for nearly a hundred years, this long boundary, now nearly four thousand miles long, has been a boundary of peace without a warship or a fortress, a soldier or a gun. Why was this agreement a remarkable...

Bibliographic information